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Old 09-07-2012, 01:43 PM   #1
Pray To Jesus
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Default How many surge protector can you daisy chain?

Without it going boom.
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Old 09-07-2012, 01:50 PM   #2
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Adding surge protectors won't make anything pop - unless you simply plug too much stuff into them, and overload the circuit.

However, you gain little surge stopping power by daisy chaining.

You may also compromise safety: too many extension cords daisy chained can lead to excessive impedance, which means a short circuit might not trip a breaker (resulting in a fire), or a ground fault may not trip a breaker, leaving dangerous voltages on the chassis of an appliance.
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Old 09-07-2012, 01:55 PM   #3
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Don't daisy-chain surge protectors...
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Old 09-07-2012, 05:40 PM   #4
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As many as you like! Think about it. You've got a surge protector rated for (say) 2,000 watts. You can then plug a bunch of those into another surge protector...does that change the rating? NO! So not you have 16,000 watts of power available. Now just plug in even more surge protectors, 128,000 watts available...and so on, and so forth.

Now here's the secret: Take the bottom surge protector, that everything is plugged into, and plug it into the top surge protector. Since the bottom surge protector is now supplying 128,000 watts, but only consumes 2,000 from the top, you get unlimited free energy.
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Old 09-07-2012, 05:50 PM   #5
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A quick guess would be that you could keep daisy chaining them until you hit the chandrasekhar limit, after that they would go boom. So, based on some quick number crunching (and a guess on the average mass of a surge protector) you should be able to daisy chain 1.108X10^32 surge protectors before they go boom.
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Old 09-07-2012, 07:00 PM   #6
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zero
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Old 09-07-2012, 07:10 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jagec View Post
As many as you like! Think about it. You've got a surge protector rated for (say) 2,000 watts. You can then plug a bunch of those into another surge protector...does that change the rating? NO! So not you have 16,000 watts of power available. Now just plug in even more surge protectors, 128,000 watts available...and so on, and so forth.

Now here's the secret: Take the bottom surge protector, that everything is plugged into, and plug it into the top surge protector. Since the bottom surge protector is now supplying 128,000 watts, but only consumes 2,000 from the top, you get unlimited free energy.
Don't forget to plug the fan into the wind power generator in case you lose electricity.
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Old 09-07-2012, 07:17 PM   #8
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Old 09-07-2012, 07:20 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jagec View Post
As many as you like! Think about it. You've got a surge protector rated for (say) 2,000 watts. You can then plug a bunch of those into another surge protector...does that change the rating? NO! So not you have 16,000 watts of power available. Now just plug in even more surge protectors, 128,000 watts available...and so on, and so forth.

Now here's the secret: Take the bottom surge protector, that everything is plugged into, and plug it into the top surge protector. Since the bottom surge protector is now supplying 128,000 watts, but only consumes 2,000 from the top, you get unlimited free energy.
I'm surprised more people don't know about this. I've been running my house on free energy for years.
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Old 09-07-2012, 07:22 PM   #10
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The fear is if you exceed the watt (or VA?) rating of the thing. Lot easier to do it with 24+ sockets than 8 -- retards out there.
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Old 11-19-2012, 11:29 AM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mark R View Post
Adding surge protectors won't make anything pop - unless you simply plug too much stuff into them, and overload the circuit.

However, you gain little surge stopping power by daisy chaining.

You may also compromise safety: too many extension cords daisy chained can lead to excessive impedance, which means a short circuit might not trip a breaker (resulting in a fire), or a ground fault may not trip a breaker, leaving dangerous voltages on the chassis of an appliance.
Damn knew I should have paid more attention in that Intro to EE course I took for fun (with all the EECS people @ Cal) back in uni. Shows that you can get an A in something and still haven't learn it.

Let see now. V = IR
P = I^2 R, given that power will be constant to run things.

R rises through series but decreases through parallel.

So if a circuit is being run parallel, then I would have to increase by the squareroot of the drop in R to keep P constant. Meaning more heat.

I'm not sure if surge protectors are in series or parallel. Most likely a combination with the series part protecting the parallel part.


So short answer:
Until it gets too hot @ the originating surge protector.



Did I get it right?

Last edited by Pray To Jesus; 11-19-2012 at 11:38 AM.
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Old 11-19-2012, 11:35 AM   #12
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Just do this and you are good to go.
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Old 11-19-2012, 11:36 AM   #13
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Remember 1500watts per CIRCUIT or you will trip the fuse> overpower the circuit.

How many protectors you daisy chain doesn't make a difference.
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Old 11-19-2012, 11:40 AM   #14
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68 because if you go to 69 you might blow a rod.
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Old 11-19-2012, 11:43 AM   #15
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Quote:
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Remember 1500watts per CIRCUIT or you will trip the fuse> overpower the circuit.

How many protectors you daisy chain doesn't make a difference.
depends on the circuit
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Old 11-19-2012, 11:50 AM   #16
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Most residential grade surge protectors are simply a MOV across the input and a few chokes.
If you daisy chain surge protectors, you are effectively putting them all in parallel.

It will actually improve performance some, but will definitely improve longevity (number of hits).
It won't make anything go boom.

Last edited by edro; 11-19-2012 at 12:01 PM.
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Old 11-19-2012, 11:55 AM   #17
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As many as Jesus allows.
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Old 11-19-2012, 11:57 AM   #18
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To see a real world example of God's handiwork, plug a surge protector into itself. Magic!
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Old 11-19-2012, 12:00 PM   #19
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Quote:
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68 because if you go to 69 you might blow a rod.
I tried 69 once, but my rod didn't blow.
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Old 11-19-2012, 01:02 PM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SMOGZINN View Post
A quick guess would be that you could keep daisy chaining them until you hit the chandrasekhar limit, after that they would go boom. So, based on some quick number crunching (and a guess on the average mass of a surge protector) you should be able to daisy chain 1.108X10^32 surge protectors before they go boom.
I had to google for the current accepted value - it's on the order of 10^30 kg. So, props for mentioning the chandrasekhar limit, but 38 surge protectors per kg? That's less than 1 ounce each!
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Last edited by DrPizza; 11-19-2012 at 01:08 PM.
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Old 11-19-2012, 03:34 PM   #21
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The Chandrasekhar limit ( /ʌndrəˈʃkɑr/) is the maximum mass of a stable white dwarf star. It was named after Subrahmanyan Chandrasekhar, the Indian-American astrophysicist who predicted it in 1930. White dwarfs, unlike main sequence stars, resist gravitational collapse primarily through electron degeneracy pressure, rather than thermal pressure. The Chandrasekhar limit is the mass above which electron degeneracy pressure in the star's core is insufficient to balance the star's own gravitational self-attraction. Consequently, white dwarfs with masses greater than the limit undergo further gravitational collapse, evolving into a different type of stellar remnant, such as a neutron star or black hole. Those with masses under the limit remain stable as white dwarfs.
The currently accepted value of the limit is about 1.44 ( 2.864 10^30 kg).[1][2]

Physics



Electron degeneracy pressure is a quantum-mechanical effect arising from the Pauli exclusion principle. Since electrons are fermions, no two electrons can be in the same state, so not all electrons can be in the minimum-energy level. Rather, electrons must occupy a band of energy levels. Compression of the electron gas increases the number of electrons in a given volume and raises the maximum energy level in the occupied band. Therefore, the energy of the electrons will increase upon compression, so pressure must be exerted on the electron gas to compress it, producing electron degeneracy pressure. With sufficient compression, electrons are forced into nuclei in the process of electron capture, relieving the pressure.
Very good! Amazing how everything can be made harder given the right stimulus!

Last edited by Pray To Jesus; 11-19-2012 at 03:38 PM.
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Old 11-19-2012, 03:48 PM   #22
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Keep going until your house burns down.

Its one less than that.
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