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View Full Version : When will the US get faster DSL?


ericeash
01-11-2007, 03:02 PM
when i lived in japan, i had 8mbps dsl which only cost me $30 a month. also available was 16mbps, 24mbps, 48mbps and 100mbps. ntt also had fiber optic dsl that i could have gotten that was 1gbps for only $100 a month. now i'm paying $40 a month for comcast 6mbps, and that is the highest they have. so, when will the US start getting really fast internet?

spidey07
01-11-2007, 03:22 PM
It's already here in some markets. Plus there is Verizons FiOS. Plus cable is going to get close to 100 Mbs in the next 2 years. Many cable operators are or have already upgraded their networks.

The telcos wanted to wait out the technology because Japan was using the older passive optical network technology (PON). Since they have to spend a lot more money it made sense to wait it out. The telcos AFAIK, selected the makers for their GPON (gigabit passive optical net) within the last 6-8 months.

With Cable and Telco's duking it out to provide voice, video and data to the customers home a rapid shift in the amount of bandwidth supplied to the home is happening. But running al that fiber long distances to the home costs a lot of money, not to mention the access gear to supply the service.

bobsmith1492
01-11-2007, 05:23 PM
Some places will not and cannot get faster DSL in the US. The speed is physically limited by the construction of the phone lines; since the US was in the lead with infrastructure when phone lines were initially installed, many of the lines in the US are still very old, and typically made with aluminum wires (cheap at the time of phone line installation in the US). The line construction and physical distance add up to limit available speeds since you cannot pump that much bandwidth through poor lines over long distances.

Japan, on the other hand, is a much smaller and more densely-packed country; in large cities, you may be blocks away from the phone switches, and the infrastructure is likely much newer (probably post-WWII) and has nicer copper lines (someone knowledgeable about Japan may correct this).

The US will always be behind due to the cost of replacing and updating infrastructure and the pure distances involved - move to a big city if you really want faster internet!

blahblah99
01-12-2007, 12:37 AM
Originally posted by: ericeash
when i lived in japan, i had 8mbps dsl which only cost me $30 a month. also available was 16mbps, 24mbps, 48mbps and 100mbps. ntt also had fiber optic dsl that i could have gotten that was 1gbps for only $100 a month. now i'm paying $40 a month for comcast 6mbps, and that is the highest they have. so, when will the US start getting really fast internet?

We were already suppose to have speeds faster than DSL based on the agreements the telecom companies made with the goverment. They got billions and billions of dollars and in return were supposed to provide fiber optic speeds to everyone in the US by 2006 or something like that.

In essence, taxpayers got screwed while telecom companies profited, and we have yet to have fiber optics except for in a few areas.

sdifox
01-12-2007, 11:57 AM
I am really waiting for fiber to the premise /home. Until then, I don't see the point of bumping up dsl/cable. I envy the people enjoying 100Mbps to their home...

BrownTown
01-12-2007, 12:47 PM
Meh, who the hell really even needs that speed? I sure don't, even if you have it the server your downloading from wont be able to keep up.

spidey07
01-12-2007, 12:52 PM
Originally posted by: BrownTown
Meh, who the hell really even needs that speed? I sure don't, even if you have it the server your downloading from wont be able to keep up.

Data centers normally have 600 - 2400 Megabits/sec connections (called OC-12 and OC-48 respectively). And many of them. It isn't that big of a deal to fill 100 megabit connection given the right conditions. There really is not such thing as too much bandwidth. For now the "network" is faster than the hosts attached to it.

sdifox
01-12-2007, 08:21 PM
Originally posted by: BrownTown
Meh, who the hell really even needs that speed? I sure don't, even if you have it the server your downloading from wont be able to keep up.

That's because you are BTing off other dsl/cable users. There are tones of people already on 100mbits, just not in north america.

BassBomb
01-12-2007, 10:18 PM
I get 10mbps cable. For ~50$ CDN a month that includes my TV cable

It is not the best I can get from my ISP

TheRyuu
01-12-2007, 11:16 PM
You can go 30/5 with Verizon FiOS.

Although I'm still waiting for it to get out here on Long Island.

sjandrewbsme
01-13-2007, 12:21 PM
I don't see this being pervasive for a long time if ever. The US market is geographically much much much less dense than Japan and there isn't a market for it here now.

Peter
01-13-2007, 12:26 PM
Correct. High speed services are commercially viable only in densely populated areas. Our scenario here in Germany is a mixed bag - up to 16M DSL in most halfway big cities, and sometimes not even 64K ISDN out in the rurals.

I say, there must be some kind of drawback to the cheap housing out in the woods ...

f95toli
01-13-2007, 01:27 PM
2-8 mbps has been available in most of Sweden for a few years now and the north of Sweden is not exactly densely populated. In cities and towns you can get 100 mpbs more or less everywhere.
Of course this has to do with the fact that Ericsson has used Sweden as a test market for telecommunications equipment for a long time meaning the telecom infrastructure has always been very good.
When I moved to Britain about 18 months ago I discovered that high speed internet is just becoming available here; I live in London but I cant get anything faster than 4 mbps to my flat (8 mpbs is available but the speed is restircted by the local exchange). As it is my mother who lives in a small Swedish town has a much faster internet connection then me (and is paying less).
I think the lack of high-speed internet connection has more to do with the US being a less mature market, in Sweden, Japan, S Korea etc most people have an internet connection and once people are "hooked" they are willing to pay more for higher speeds in order to be able to e.g. download music, movies etc.

jagec
01-14-2007, 05:20 AM
Originally posted by: f95toli
I think the lack of high-speed internet connection has more to do with the US being a less mature market, in Sweden, Japan, S Korea etc most people have an internet connection and once people are "hooked" they are willing to pay more for higher speeds in order to be able to e.g. download music, movies etc.


...or, more likely, watch anime tentacle porn. You're right, the lack of broadband probably does have to do with the US being less of a "mature" market. Smut and e-business are probably the two biggest drivers for faster connections and bigger hard drives.

GundamSonicZeroX
01-14-2007, 05:02 PM
Originally posted by: jagec

Originally posted by: f95toli
I think the lack of high-speed internet connection has more to do with the US being a less mature market, in Sweden, Japan, S Korea etc most people have an internet connection and once people are "hooked" they are willing to pay more for higher speeds in order to be able to e.g. download music, movies etc.


...or, more likely, watch anime tentacle porn. You're right, the lack of broadband probably does have to do with the US being less of a "mature" market. Smut and e-business are probably the two biggest drivers for faster connections and bigger hard drives.
Lol (http://i14.photobucket.com/albums/a328/GSZX/20050613h.jpg)
This came to my mind. :D

NZ
01-17-2007, 07:39 PM
in new zealand the typical adsl connection is only 2mbps. But somehow the data is never transferred at 2mb per second but rather like 50 kb per second

Peter
01-18-2007, 11:07 AM
That's because it is 2 megaBIT, which would theoretically be good for about 220 kiloBYTES per second. However, actual throughput depends on everything inbetween (and including) your machine and whoever you're downloading the data from on the other end.

PlasmaBomb
01-18-2007, 01:05 PM
I was very impressed with my 2 megabit conection actually getting 220-230 kilobytes once :)

StopSign
01-22-2007, 09:58 AM
Europe has some crazy fast connections too.

Genx87
01-22-2007, 10:26 AM
I really enjoy my Charter 3Mbps down 256kbps upload.
Nothing says blazing fast as 256kbps up, unless of course you read their marketing blurb about that upload being ridiculously fast for sending email.

fyleow
01-23-2007, 04:19 PM
..

xSauronx
01-26-2007, 10:56 PM
Originally posted by: PlasmaBomb
I was very impressed with my 2 megabit conection actually getting 220-230 kilobytes once :)

you guys should all be so happy. i live in kansas and work with an ISP that provides wireless internet access to rural homes and the best we offer is a 1megabit up/down link, and thats at 100 bucks a month. the base package starts at 256 up and down with a 1500k burst and some of these people are *Elated* once their service is running

the boss offered to get me a free account but i declined. the equipment is damn pricey and i desire *bandwidth* damnit!

im using 6m/768k dsl

im happy, i may cut it down, as all i have is a laptop and i dont have the storage space to really put all the bandwidth to use :(

charrison
01-28-2007, 04:48 PM
ATT is deploying VDSL now. However right now they are using most of its faster bandwidth for TV services. Hopefully they will market a data only connection for those that do desire faster broadband connections.

fraquar
01-29-2007, 12:35 AM
Good old American capitalism at work.

The most powerful country and technologically advanced country on the planet - and we offer it's citizens 3rd generation products - all in the name of profit maximization.

The US citizens will NEVER be on pace technologically at the user level - it isn't "highly" profitable for businesses to do so. We lag behind in next generation automobile technology, cell phone technology, Internet connectivity, you name it we lag behind in it - and yet pay out the nose for the watered down technology we do have.

Added: This subject became a documentary on PBS - where the Telecomm companies took the city of Lafayette to court to BLOCK their taxpayer funded initiative to lay their OWN Fiber Network - after Bell South told them it would likely take 10-15 years to get Fiber laid in Lafayette (small unprofitable market).

Internet quest gets squashed (http://www.usatoday.com/news/opinion/2005-01-10-broadband-bellsouth-our_x.htm)

It's NEVER about the technology - thats the easy part.