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View Full Version : What country, civilization, culture, or race do you think has contributed most to modern society?


Doggiedog
04-25-2006, 10:40 PM
It can be anything, positive or negative. Medicine, engineering, religion, technology, girls, whatever.

Discuss.

loup garou
04-25-2006, 10:41 PM
Aliens

Zim Hosein
04-25-2006, 10:42 PM
Originally posted by: loup garou
Aliens

I concur :beer:

TheoPetro
04-25-2006, 10:42 PM
mayans in south america they developed the comcept of zero

kogase
04-25-2006, 10:43 PM
Germans. Damn good food, best music, best literature, Einstein (although I guess we'd have to throw Jews into the mix with that)... Hitler.

kogase
04-25-2006, 10:44 PM
Originally posted by: TheoPetro
myans in south america they developed the comcept of zero

Wow, Mayans really got the bottom of the barrel when they picked for the "Things my culture is good at" list.

dethman
04-25-2006, 10:44 PM
china. i dont know why.

ed21x
04-25-2006, 10:44 PM
It really depends on where you are:

In the West:
Civilization: European
Culture: European

East:
Civilization: Asian
Culture: Asian

Shawn
04-25-2006, 11:05 PM
The Greeks and Romans contributed an awful lot.

chambersc
04-25-2006, 11:06 PM
Originally posted by: kogase
Germans. Damn good food, best music, best literature, Einstein (although I guess we'd have to throw Jews into the mix with that)... Hitler.

seconded

Turkish
04-25-2006, 11:07 PM
You guys gotta be kiddin. Romans for sure.

Epic Fail
04-25-2006, 11:09 PM
Vatican City

raildogg
04-25-2006, 11:09 PM
Originally posted by: chambersc

Originally posted by: kogase
Germans. Damn good food, best music, best literature, Einstein (although I guess we'd have to throw Jews into the mix with that)... Hitler.

seconded

Also people that caused 50-100 million deaths in the 20th century, almost wiped an entire race, destroyed tremendous amounts of historical items, distorted history, brainwashed a whole entire generation, caused so much misery worldwide.

I guess good food, best music, best literature, Einstein definately offset that.

Wait, the Germans have the best music?

necine
04-25-2006, 11:10 PM
Romans.

kogase
04-25-2006, 11:12 PM
Originally posted by: raildogg

Originally posted by: chambersc

Originally posted by: kogase
Germans. Damn good food, best music, best literature, Einstein (although I guess we'd have to throw Jews into the mix with that)... Hitler.

seconded

Also people that caused 50-100 million deaths in the 20th century, almost wiped an entire race, destroyed tremendous amounts of historical items, distorted history, brainwashed a whole entire generation, caused so much misery worldwide.

I guess good food, best music, best literature, Einstein definately offset that.

Wait, the Germans have the best music?

Oh, aren't you a Negative Nancy? Sure, focus on all the bad. You know, the Greeks and the Romans, not to mention the Jews (read the Old Testament) weren't all peaches and cream and sweet chocolate dreams, they did some pretty fvcked up sh|t in their day.

raildogg
04-25-2006, 11:12 PM
Umm, I don't it is possible to know. Some have contributed more in some ways while others have contributed in other ways. If everyone contributed equally, then things wouldn't be right. People who you think don't contribute much actually do.

imported_Scourge
04-25-2006, 11:12 PM
Canada.

raildogg
04-25-2006, 11:14 PM
Originally posted by: kogase

Originally posted by: raildogg

Originally posted by: chambersc

Originally posted by: kogase
Germans. Damn good food, best music, best literature, Einstein (although I guess we'd have to throw Jews into the mix with that)... Hitler.

seconded

Also people that caused 50-100 million deaths in the 20th century, almost wiped an entire race, destroyed tremendous amounts of historical items, distorted history, brainwashed a whole entire generation, caused so much misery worldwide.

I guess good food, best music, best literature, Einstein definately offset that.

Wait, the Germans have the best music?

Oh, aren't you a Negative Nancy? Sure, focus on all the bad. You know, the Greeks and the Romans, not to mention the Jews (read the Old Testament) weren't all peaches and cream and sweet chocolate dreams, they did some pretty fvcked up sh|t in their day.

No, but your points are solely based on opinion.

Good food? That is your opinion and I'm sure it is in the minority. Best music? Highly doubtful. Best literature? Compared to what?

They do have a foothold in the sciences and technology, at least they did.

AlienCraft
04-25-2006, 11:16 PM
The Chinese.

Proletariat
04-25-2006, 11:16 PM
Originally posted by: TheoPetro
mayans in south america they developed the comcept of zero

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/0_(number)

kogase
04-25-2006, 11:17 PM
Originally posted by: raildogg
Good food? That is your opinion and I'm sure it is in the minority. Best music? Highly doubtful. Best literature? Compared to what?

They do have a foothold in the sciences and technology.

Notice I said "damn good" for food rather than perfect?

Best music... Bach, Handel, Haydn, Mozart, Beethoven, Schubert, Schumann, Wagner, Mahler, Strauss (two of them), Schoenberg, the list goes on and on. Unless, of course, you're someone who thinks Aerosmith and Styx made the greatest musical contribution in recorded history... well, you're welcome to your opinion. Best literature, compared to... what? The rest of the world.

fitzov
04-25-2006, 11:18 PM
What, you never saw My Big Fat Greek Wedding?

raildogg
04-25-2006, 11:21 PM
Originally posted by: kogase

Originally posted by: raildogg
Good food? That is your opinion and I'm sure it is in the minority. Best music? Highly doubtful. Best literature? Compared to what?

They do have a foothold in the sciences and technology.

Notice I said "damn good" for food rather than perfect?

Best music... Bach, Haydn, Mozart, Beethoven, Schubert, Schumann, Wagner, Mahler, Strauss (two of them), Schoenberg, the list goes on and on. Unless, of course, you're someone who thinks Aerosmith and Styx made the greatest musical contribution in recorded history... well, you're welcome to your opinion. Best literature, compared to... what? The rest of the world.

Most people don't listen to those people you listed, but that doesn't mean much. They did produced great music and have influenced artists worldwide. But artists from from other places influence artists in other ways as well. Look at everything broadly. Aerosmith? Nah, I prefer Britney Spears.

Tell a person in Nepal how great Bach is. Or tell a person in India how great Wagner is. Just because they don't know about these people doesn't mean they contributed any less. I'm sure a person from Russia will tell you how great their musicians are.

Literature? Well, we can list all the pieces of literature from every country and debate about that.

I still don't think one country or civilization has contributed more than any other. They all contribute in different ways.

Kelvrick
04-25-2006, 11:25 PM
Originally posted by: necine
Romans.

I think Romans were amazing and probably accomplished the most on their own, but for total contributino, I don't know...

They did collapse and basically take all of their advances with them only to be discovered later, so I don't know how much they actually contributed.

kogase
04-25-2006, 11:26 PM
Originally posted by: raildogg

Originally posted by: kogase

Originally posted by: raildogg
Good food? That is your opinion and I'm sure it is in the minority. Best music? Highly doubtful. Best literature? Compared to what?

They do have a foothold in the sciences and technology.

Notice I said "damn good" for food rather than perfect?

Best music... Bach, Haydn, Mozart, Beethoven, Schubert, Schumann, Wagner, Mahler, Strauss (two of them), Schoenberg, the list goes on and on. Unless, of course, you're someone who thinks Aerosmith and Styx made the greatest musical contribution in recorded history... well, you're welcome to your opinion. Best literature, compared to... what? The rest of the world.

Most people don't listen to those people you listed. They did produce great music and have influenced artists worldwide. But artists from from other places influence artists in other ways as well. Look at everything broadly. Aerosmith? Nah, I prefer Britney Spears.

Literature? Well, we can list all the pieces of literature from every country and debate about that.

I still don't think one country or civilization has contributed more than any other. They all contribute in different ways.

Obviously this thread is going to be rife with opionated claptrap, so I'm giving you mine. What's the problem? One country has not contributed more than any other? Maybe, but a handful of countries sure contributed a hell of a lot more than the remaining 20394802. Germany happens to be my favorite.

Also, the composers (there are plenty more prolific and beloved German composers) I listed... Germany has contributed a great number of very influential, accomplished, and critically aclaimed composers. Even if other countries have a few oustanding composers/musicians, I can't think of any (without the possible exception of America), who match Germany in sheer number and influence.

GTaudiophile
04-25-2006, 11:26 PM
Egyptians > Greeks > Romans > Germans > Americans

raildogg
04-25-2006, 11:26 PM
Originally posted by: Kelvrick

Originally posted by: necine
Romans.

I think Romans were amazing and probably accomplished the most on their own, but for total contributino, I don't know...

They did collapse and basically take all of their advances with them only to be discovered later, so I don't know how much they actually contributed.

Their great inventions and technological breakthroughs are still used today. Our modern stadiums are basically upgraded versions of the colloseum. They built the first highways. Water systems, plumbing, etc.

Powermoloch
04-25-2006, 11:28 PM
Babylon, Mathematics FTW

raildogg
04-25-2006, 11:31 PM
Originally posted by: kogase

Originally posted by: raildogg

Originally posted by: kogase

Originally posted by: raildogg
Good food? That is your opinion and I'm sure it is in the minority. Best music? Highly doubtful. Best literature? Compared to what?

They do have a foothold in the sciences and technology.

Notice I said "damn good" for food rather than perfect?

Best music... Bach, Haydn, Mozart, Beethoven, Schubert, Schumann, Wagner, Mahler, Strauss (two of them), Schoenberg, the list goes on and on. Unless, of course, you're someone who thinks Aerosmith and Styx made the greatest musical contribution in recorded history... well, you're welcome to your opinion. Best literature, compared to... what? The rest of the world.

Most people don't listen to those people you listed. They did produce great music and have influenced artists worldwide. But artists from from other places influence artists in other ways as well. Look at everything broadly. Aerosmith? Nah, I prefer Britney Spears.

Literature? Well, we can list all the pieces of literature from every country and debate about that.

I still don't think one country or civilization has contributed more than any other. They all contribute in different ways.

Obviously this thread is going to be rife with opionated claptrap, so I'm giving you mine. What's the problem? One country has not contributed more than any other? Maybe, but a handful of countries sure contributed a hell of a lot more than the remaining 20394802. Germany happens to be my favorite.

Also, the composers (there are plenty more prolific and beloved German composers) I listed... Germany has contributed a great number of very influential, accomplished, and critically aclaimed composers.

Yes, they are your favorite. I have no favorite. I feel that people balance each other out and some take their talents to do other things with them. Whatever makes them happy. And that, contributes to society.

Germany has a lot of talented people, but so does every country out there. They just get noticed more and that doesn't mean that we should take anything away from them, but just take that into account. I'm sure there were other people as talented as the ones you listed above in other places around the globe, but they just happen to "make" it. There are great pieces of music that we've never heard of that originated in the forests of Brazil.

Don't want to argue about this, sorry.

There are things which are not seen and for that, we have to look below the surface.

JulesMaximus
04-25-2006, 11:33 PM
Romans.

/Thread

HamburgerBoy
04-25-2006, 11:35 PM
The USA, Greece, or Rome.


Originally posted by: TheoPetro
mayans in south america they developed the comcept of zero

They weren't the only ones though... were they? I mean, we didn't get it from them way back then, right?

ts3433
04-25-2006, 11:38 PM
Tell a person in Nepal how great Bach is. Or tell a person in India how great Wagner is. Just because they don't know about these people doesn't mean they contributed any less. I'm sure a person from Russia will tell you how great their musicians are.

In the context of the music of the Western world (with which the majority of us here are connected much more directly than with the East), the Nepalese and other Asian peoples did, in fact, contribute much less (perhaps nothing at all). I don't believe you can try to connect or relate the European classical tradition to other musical traditions outside the West, especially considering that until recently there would never have been any practical means for the two traditions to mingle much. As for Russia, it became connected with the European classical tradition in the latter part of the 19th century; before then, Russia was a cultural backwater of sorts.

Edit: Removed comment based on something that I obviously didn't read thoroughly enough.

Kelvrick
04-25-2006, 11:38 PM
Originally posted by: raildogg

Originally posted by: Kelvrick

Originally posted by: necine
Romans.

I think Romans were amazing and probably accomplished the most on their own, but for total contributino, I don't know...

They did collapse and basically take all of their advances with them only to be discovered later, so I don't know how much they actually contributed.

Their great inventions and technological breakthroughs are still used today. Our modern stadiums are basically upgraded versions of the colloseum. They built the first highways. Water systems, plumbing, etc.

You may be right, but the way I'm thinking is that these things were rediscovered elsewhere, and they didn't actually contribute the technology/knowledge to the rest of the world considering the large time period where their advances weren't utilized. Maybe I'm wrong, but I'm at work, bored, so link me some reading material to prove me wrong.

Proletariat
04-25-2006, 11:44 PM
I'd say Greece and Rome, Sumeria, India, Persia, China and now the US

raildogg
04-25-2006, 11:44 PM
Originally posted by: ts3433
To nitpick a little bit, kogase, most of the composers you named (except Bach, Handel, and Schumann) are all Austrian or connected with Austria rather than Germany.


Tell a person in Nepal how great Bach is. Or tell a person in India how great Wagner is. Just because they don't know about these people doesn't mean they contributed any less. I'm sure a person from Russia will tell you how great their musicians are.

In the context of the music of the Western world (with which the majority of us here are connected much more directly than with the East), the Nepalese and other Asian peoples did, in fact, contribute much less (perhaps nothing at all). I don't believe you can try to connect or relate the European classical tradition to other musical traditions outside the West, especially considering that until recently there would never have been any practical means for the two traditions to mingle much. As for Russia, it became connected with the European classical tradition in the latter part of the 19th century; before then, Russia was a cultural backwater of sorts.

If you look at this from a global point of view, then other forms of art and music besides the European ones did contribute a lot. That is what I was trying to say. Similarly, the Eastern art and music doesn't always connect with the West.

ts3433
04-25-2006, 11:48 PM
Originally posted by: Kelvrick

Originally posted by: raildogg

Originally posted by: Kelvrick

Originally posted by: necine
Romans.

I think Romans were amazing and probably accomplished the most on their own, but for total contributino, I don't know...

They did collapse and basically take all of their advances with them only to be discovered later, so I don't know how much they actually contributed.

Their great inventions and technological breakthroughs are still used today. Our modern stadiums are basically upgraded versions of the colloseum. They built the first highways. Water systems, plumbing, etc.

You may be right, but the way I'm thinking is that these things were rediscovered elsewhere, and they didn't actually contribute the technology/knowledge to the rest of the world considering the large time period where their advances weren't utilized. Maybe I'm wrong, but I'm at work, bored, so link me some reading material to prove me wrong.

Sure, they had to be rediscovered, but that doesn't change the fact that the Rome was the progenitor of all those advances. I doubt that people from the Renaissance forward recreated Roman technology ex nihilo--in fact, an integral part of the Renaissance was looking back to the golden age of republican Rome.

kogase
04-25-2006, 11:53 PM
Originally posted by: ts3433
To nitpick a little bit, kogase, most of the composers you named (except Bach, Handel, and Schumann) are all Austrian or connected with Austria rather than Germany.

I can't contribute much more to the thread, because I'm going to bed (dammit, an unwanted rhyme), but that's why I originally said "Germans". I wasn't talking about the country Germany, but rather about the German people and culture, of which Austria is a part.

AmdEmAll
04-25-2006, 11:54 PM
Greenlandians

ts3433
04-25-2006, 11:58 PM
Originally posted by: kogase

Originally posted by: ts3433
To nitpick a little bit, kogase, most of the composers you named (except Bach, Handel, and Schumann) are all Austrian or connected with Austria rather than Germany.

I can't contribute much more to the thread, because I'm going to bed (dammit, an unwanted rhyme), but that's why I originally said "Germans". I wasn't talking about the country Germany, but rather about the German people and culture, of which Austria is a part.

D'oh. Why would I bring that up when what is known today as Germany was fragmented significantly for much of that time period anyway? >.<

DainBramaged
04-26-2006, 12:03 AM
Originally posted by: GTaudiophile
DainBramaged > Egyptians > Greeks > Romans > Germans > Americans

RbSX
04-26-2006, 12:04 AM
England:

Cultural development

America:

I'm sure there has got to be something

I dunno

Azndude2190
04-26-2006, 12:04 AM
Aryan(spelled right?)

-Hitler-

bluewall21
04-26-2006, 12:07 AM
Egyptians, Greeks, and Indians.

ed21x
04-26-2006, 12:34 AM
Originally posted by: ts3433

Tell a person in Nepal how great Bach is. Or tell a person in India how great Wagner is. Just because they don't know about these people doesn't mean they contributed any less. I'm sure a person from Russia will tell you how great their musicians are.

In the context of the music of the Western world (with which the majority of us here are connected much more directly than with the East), the Nepalese and other Asian peoples did, in fact, contribute much less (perhaps nothing at all). I don't believe you can try to connect or relate the European classical tradition to other musical traditions outside the West, especially considering that until recently there would never have been any practical means for the two traditions to mingle much. As for Russia, it became connected with the European classical tradition in the latter part of the 19th century; before then, Russia was a cultural backwater of sorts.

Edit: Removed comment based on something that I obviously didn't read thoroughly enough.


yeah, as much as I respect western classical music and hold it in high regard, many westerners don't understand that the world doesn't necessarily share this same level of respect or regard. In Asia, you'll see that the musical style and influence that everything is based off of is from China, and that has spread to Korea, Japan, Taiwan, Singapore, Malaysia, etc... Classical music has contributed very little to this sphere, and vise versa.

tnilC
04-26-2006, 12:34 AM
Originally posted by: GTaudiophile
Egyptians > Greeks > Romans > Germans > Americans

Best answer yet.

kalster
04-26-2006, 12:37 AM
Indians

Molondo
04-26-2006, 12:42 AM
Bosnia (http://www.mobisux.com/album/data/500/18106cevapi-med.jpg)

Goddamn that ****** is damn good.

aidanjm
04-26-2006, 01:03 AM
our concept of democracy pretty much had it's beginnings in ancient Greece

JinLien
04-26-2006, 01:13 AM
Originally posted by: Proletariat

Originally posted by: TheoPetro
mayans in south america they developed the comcept of zero

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/0_(number)
Olmec are pre Mayan.

JinLien
04-26-2006, 01:15 AM
Originally posted by: tnilC

Originally posted by: GTaudiophile
Egyptians > Greeks > Romans > Germans > Americans

Best answer yet.

Don't for get the great contributions from the Indians, Chinese, and Central/South American.

Schadenfreude
04-26-2006, 01:44 AM
I'd want to say the Chinese for the invention of paper, the greatest invention on Earth; and gunpowder as well, but the clock (Egypt) is a mean feat as well - not to mention computers (US), planes(US), automobiles(Germany), the numeral zero (Indian, since they were the ones who brought it to world-wide use), philosophy(Greece-Germany-China-India), mathematics(?), physics(?), etc. . ..

I dunno :confused:

sobriquet
04-26-2006, 02:06 AM
Originally posted by: ed21x

Originally posted by: ts3433

Tell a person in Nepal how great Bach is. Or tell a person in India how great Wagner is. Just because they don't know about these people doesn't mean they contributed any less. I'm sure a person from Russia will tell you how great their musicians are.

In the context of the music of the Western world (with which the majority of us here are connected much more directly than with the East), the Nepalese and other Asian peoples did, in fact, contribute much less (perhaps nothing at all). I don't believe you can try to connect or relate the European classical tradition to other musical traditions outside the West, especially considering that until recently there would never have been any practical means for the two traditions to mingle much. As for Russia, it became connected with the European classical tradition in the latter part of the 19th century; before then, Russia was a cultural backwater of sorts.

Edit: Removed comment based on something that I obviously didn't read thoroughly enough.


yeah, as much as I respect western classical music and hold it in high regard, many westerners don't understand that the world doesn't necessarily share this same level of respect or regard. In Asia, you'll see that the musical style and influence that everything is based off of is from China, and that has spread to Korea, Japan, Taiwan, Singapore, Malaysia, etc... Classical music has contributed very little to this sphere, and vise versa.

There have been numerous instances of musical mixings between the East and West throughout history. Arabic music heavily influencing Spanish music via the Moors, Spanish and Portugese music influencing South American music via the conquistadores, and then of course huge Asian influences on European music via colonial projects. Debussy, for example, drew directly from colonized South Asian culture.

Asian, specifically Chinese and Japanese, art music traditions have been deeply affected in recent years by European traditions. Tan Dun in China and Toru Takemitsu in Japan both drew IMMENSELY from Western styles.

As for the prominence of German composers in the European tradition, most of it traces back to the establishment and institutionalization of historical musicology in the 19th century (Musikwissenschaft). The discipline, practiced by Germans, defaulted to demonstrating the "greatness" of German musicians. Americans, drawing both musicological practice and cultural sensibilities from the Germans, came to understand German composers as "great." Had it not been for the likes of Mendelssohn with the Bach revival, we might not think the same way about Beethoven and his gang nowadays. Consider that there might not be anything inherently "great" about German music beyond what we have been instructed to consider "great."

Playmaker
04-26-2006, 02:14 AM
Originally posted by: aidanjm
our concept of democracy pretty much had it's beginnings in ancient Greece

Agreed. They set the tone for western culture. It has to be the Greeks followed by the Romans. You can argue all night about the rest.

kogase
04-26-2006, 08:54 AM
Originally posted by: ed21x
yeah, as much as I respect western classical music and hold it in high regard, many westerners don't understand that the world doesn't necessarily share this same level of respect or regard. In Asia, you'll see that the musical style and influence that everything is based off of is from China, and that has spread to Korea, Japan, Taiwan, Singapore, Malaysia, etc... Classical music has contributed very little to this sphere, and vise versa.

I don't think that's true. Particularly in China, Japan and Korea (very much and increasingly westernized countries) western music has made a huge impact. This most translates itself into pop/rock music, but western classical music is also held in very high regard (consider the large number of virtuoso Chinese classical musicians). Traditional Asian music is pretty much like "Japanese classical" in Japan.

LeadMagnet
04-26-2006, 09:05 AM
Greek
Romans
English
German
American
Russian

Inspector Jihad
04-26-2006, 09:08 AM
white people

0roo0roo
04-26-2006, 09:08 AM
we've been to the moon biatch!

Legend
04-26-2006, 09:13 AM
Most recently (past 500 years), the Germans have contributed a huge amount to science and music.

Even after World War II, the paperclip operation pretty much boosted our research in space flight and ICBMs.



we've been to the moon biatch!

We sure did...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wernher_von_Braun



In ancient times, Rome/Greece. However much of their advances were lost and rediscovered. In terms of culture, probably England. I don't think any other country has had as much global influence as they did. Remember they occupied about 25% of the world about 100 years ago.

In the near future, I forsee China, America, Japan, Korea, and a united Europe contributing the most.

j00fek
04-26-2006, 09:36 AM
Originally posted by: Zim Hosein

Originally posted by: loup garou
Aliens

I concur :beer:

:moon:

xSauronx
04-26-2006, 09:41 AM
Originally posted by: Kelvrick

Originally posted by: necine
Romans.

I think Romans were amazing and probably accomplished the most on their own, but for total contributino, I don't know...

They did collapse and basically take all of their advances with them only to be discovered later, so I don't know how much they actually contributed.

REG:
Yeah. All right, Stan. Don't labour the point. And what have they ever given us in return?!
XERXES:
The aqueduct?
REG:
What?
XERXES:
The aqueduct.
REG:
Oh. Yeah, yeah. They did give us that. Uh, that's true. Yeah.
COMMANDO #3:
And the sanitation.
LORETTA:
Oh, yeah, the sanitation, Reg. Remember what the city used to be like?
REG:
Yeah. All right. I'll grant you the aqueduct and the sanitation are two things that the Romans have done.
MATTHIAS:
And the roads.
REG:
Well, yeah. Obviously the roads. I mean, the roads go without saying, don't they? But apart from the sanitation, the aqueduct, and the roads--
COMMANDO:
Irrigation.
XERXES:
Medicine.
COMMANDOS:
Huh? Heh? Huh...
COMMANDO #2:
Education.
COMMANDOS:
Ohh...
REG:
Yeah, yeah. All right. Fair enough.
COMMANDO #1:
And the wine.
COMMANDOS:
Oh, yes. Yeah...
FRANCIS:
Yeah. Yeah, that's something we'd really miss, Reg, if the Romans left. Huh.
COMMANDO:
Public baths.
LORETTA:
And it's safe to walk in the streets at night now, Reg.
FRANCIS:
Yeah, they certainly know how to keep order. Let's face it. They're the only ones who could in a place like this.
COMMANDOS:
Hehh, heh. Heh heh heh heh heh heh heh.
REG:
All right, but apart from the sanitation, the medicine, education, wine, public order, irrigation, roads, a fresh water system, and public health, what have the Romans ever done for us?
XERXES:
Brought peace.
REG:
Oh. Peace? Shut up!

lozina
04-26-2006, 09:42 AM
For me it's a toss up between Greeks or Romans

lozina
04-26-2006, 09:46 AM
Originally posted by: Molondo
Bosnia (http://www.mobisux.com/album/data/500/18106cevapi-med.jpg)

Goddamn that ****** is damn good.

hehe, yeah cevapi are awesome. There's a balkan meat store near me that sells it. Over the summer I buy it all the time and grill it. They also sell ajvar there to go on top of the cevapi

SampSon
04-26-2006, 09:49 AM
The Canadians have some great marijuana, they get my vote.

desteffy
04-26-2006, 09:52 AM
romans

fitzov
04-26-2006, 11:04 AM
Originally posted by: desteffy
romans

The Judean Peoples Front

xSauronx
04-27-2006, 06:32 AM
Originally posted by: fitzov

Originally posted by: desteffy
romans

The Judean Peoples Front

splitter!

Lonyo
04-27-2006, 06:45 AM
Originally posted by: xSauronx

Originally posted by: Kelvrick

Originally posted by: necine
Romans.

I think Romans were amazing and probably accomplished the most on their own, but for total contributino, I don't know...

They did collapse and basically take all of their advances with them only to be discovered later, so I don't know how much they actually contributed.

REG:
Yeah. All right, Stan. Don't labour the point. And what have they ever given us in return?!
XERXES:
The aqueduct?
REG:
What?
XERXES:
The aqueduct.
REG:
Oh. Yeah, yeah. They did give us that. Uh, that's true. Yeah.
COMMANDO #3:
And the sanitation.
LORETTA:
Oh, yeah, the sanitation, Reg. Remember what the city used to be like?
REG:
Yeah. All right. I'll grant you the aqueduct and the sanitation are two things that the Romans have done.
MATTHIAS:
And the roads.
REG:
Well, yeah. Obviously the roads. I mean, the roads go without saying, don't they? But apart from the sanitation, the aqueduct, and the roads--
COMMANDO:
Irrigation.
XERXES:
Medicine.
COMMANDOS:
Huh? Heh? Huh...
COMMANDO #2:
Education.
COMMANDOS:
Ohh...
REG:
Yeah, yeah. All right. Fair enough.
COMMANDO #1:
And the wine.
COMMANDOS:
Oh, yes. Yeah...
FRANCIS:
Yeah. Yeah, that's something we'd really miss, Reg, if the Romans left. Huh.
COMMANDO:
Public baths.
LORETTA:
And it's safe to walk in the streets at night now, Reg.
FRANCIS:
Yeah, they certainly know how to keep order. Let's face it. They're the only ones who could in a place like this.
COMMANDOS:
Hehh, heh. Heh heh heh heh heh heh heh.
REG:
All right, but apart from the sanitation, the medicine, education, wine, public order, irrigation, roads, a fresh water system, and public health, what have the Romans ever done for us?
XERXES:
Brought peace.
REG:
Oh. Peace? Shut up!

But the Romans didn't invent all those :P

Czar
04-27-2006, 06:52 AM
Romans
Greeks
Babylonians
English

Skyclad1uhm1
04-27-2006, 07:00 AM
The Chinese.

Wars have been the great technology boosters, and the Chinese developed gunpowder. Without that we'd still be using bows and arrows.

Cristatus
04-27-2006, 07:01 AM
Originally posted by: Schadenfreude
I'd want to say the Chinese for the invention of paper, the greatest invention on Earth; and gunpowder as well, but the clock (Egypt) is a mean feat as well - not to mention computers (US), planes(US), automobiles(Germany), the numeral zero (Indian, since they were the ones who brought it to world-wide use), philosophy(Greece-Germany-China-India), mathematics(?), physics(?), etc. . ..

I dunno :confused:

I would and the Kamasutra to India as well (or Literature). Read the first line here (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Indian_literature). Oh yeah, and, not to mention: I think one of the, if not the, first planned city in the world (from around 2600 BC according to this (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Planned_city#Indus_Valley_Civilization) article), and they had better sanitation than anybody in the world then (I believe the Romans got theirs at some time in AD? could be wrong). Hell, it's supposed to be better than sanitation at the moment in some un-developed countries (though I hate using the phrase "undeveloped countries" because it's so vague.).

Colt45
04-27-2006, 07:05 AM
Originally posted by: Molondo
Bosnia (http://www.mobisux.com/album/data/500/18106cevapi-med.jpg)

Goddamn that ****** is damn good.

mmmmm cevapcici

roguerower
04-27-2006, 07:12 AM
Quahog, Rhode Island

0roo0roo
04-27-2006, 07:15 AM
Originally posted by: Legend
Most recently (past 500 years), the Germans have contributed a huge amount to science and music.

Even after World War II, the paperclip operation pretty much boosted our research in space flight and ICBMs.



we've been to the moon biatch!

We sure did...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wernher_von_Braun



In ancient times, Rome/Greece. However much of their advances were lost and rediscovered. In terms of culture, probably England. I don't think any other country has had as much global influence as they did. Remember they occupied about 25% of the world about 100 years ago.

In the near future, I forsee China, America, Japan, Korea, and a united Europe contributing the most.

well no sh*t, but the russians also had their share of german scientists and a good chunk of v1-2 rocket tech that we couldn't cart off before they took over east germany. fact is he did it for america, and we are a nation of immigrants after all. von braun was instrumental but he didn't do it alone. it took a huge chunk of our resources and money during those years to actually pull off that moon landing. a mission we had to complete to fulfill the promise of a fallen president. course one can play the game of denigrating achievements by saying it was based on this or that or he was originally from here or there until it becomes meaningless.

and yes england. ithink the french are bitter still lol:) look at the english speaking world. us/canada/uk/australia/new zealand.... no wonder they are so afraid lol:)
http://www.members.tripod.com/The_English_dept/esc.html

manohartvs
04-27-2006, 07:25 AM
Originally posted by: TheoPetro
mayans in south america they developed the comcept of zero

LOL! Mayans? HAHAHAHA ZERO??? HAHAHA

0roo0roo
04-27-2006, 07:38 AM
Originally posted by: manohartvs

Originally posted by: TheoPetro
mayans in south america they developed the comcept of zero

LOL! Mayans? HAHAHAHA ZERO??? HAHAHA

yea before that if u said i gots nothin people would say thats unpossible!;)
%#@ mayans didn't even have the wheel. the wheel for f**ks sake...wtfs with that? arghh...

sao123
04-27-2006, 07:39 AM
European's seem to contribute most of the girls in my pron collection....

L:)L

tynopik
04-27-2006, 09:54 AM
as far as contributing to the modern state of the world, it is quite easy: britain

they had the largest empire OF ALL TIME

plus america is as it is because of the influence of british values

also think partition of india and pakistan, formation of israel, shape of modern middle east, australia being 'europe south', europe not being run by germany or russia

britain has had a huge impact on the shape of the world today

Turkish
04-27-2006, 10:14 AM
Originally posted by: tynopik
as far as contributing to the modern state of the world, it is quite easy: britain

they had the largest empire OF ALL TIME

plus america is as it is because of the influence of british values

also think partition of india and pakistan, formation of israel, shape of modern middle east, australia being 'europe south', europe not being run by germany or russia

britain has had a huge impact on the shape of the world today


no they didn't.


and also, those things that you mention are not the social dimensions of modern society. they may have had a role in formation of those nations, but so did germany, france, portugal, etc. sure, the british were the king of colonies but the one that had the most contribution to modern society? not in my opinion... romans did.

tynopik
04-27-2006, 10:36 AM
you can argue about who had a bigger impact, but you can't argue about size of empire

britain's was far larger than rome's

sao123
04-27-2006, 10:49 AM
Originally posted by: tynopik
you can argue about who had a bigger impact, but you can't argue about size of empire

britain's was far larger than rome's

indeed.

nCred
04-27-2006, 11:05 AM
The british started the industrial revolution, 90% of us would be farmers if it wasnt for that.

Legend
04-27-2006, 11:26 AM
Originally posted by: Turkish

Originally posted by: tynopik
as far as contributing to the modern state of the world, it is quite easy: britain

they had the largest empire OF ALL TIME

plus america is as it is because of the influence of british values

also think partition of india and pakistan, formation of israel, shape of modern middle east, australia being 'europe south', europe not being run by germany or russia

britain has had a huge impact on the shape of the world today


no they didn't.


and also, those things that you mention are not the social dimensions of modern society. they may have had a role in formation of those nations, but so did germany, france, portugal, etc. sure, the british were the king of colonies but the one that had the most contribution to modern society? not in my opinion... romans did.


How exactly did you come to that conclusion? When Rome fell, so did it's technology and most of it's contributions. Britain's contributions can be seen all the time. Like calculus, the industrial revolution.

And it was bigger than Rome's. That's factual:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:British_Empire_1897.jpg
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:LocationRomanEmpire.png

Turkish
04-27-2006, 11:34 AM
Originally posted by: tynopik
you can argue about who had a bigger impact, but you can't argue about size of empire

britain's was far larger than rome's

what i meant was, if we are merely talking about size, it was the Mongols.

Turkish
04-27-2006, 11:35 AM
Originally posted by: Legend

Originally posted by: Turkish

Originally posted by: tynopik
as far as contributing to the modern state of the world, it is quite easy: britain

they had the largest empire OF ALL TIME

plus america is as it is because of the influence of british values

also think partition of india and pakistan, formation of israel, shape of modern middle east, australia being 'europe south', europe not being run by germany or russia

britain has had a huge impact on the shape of the world today


no they didn't.


and also, those things that you mention are not the social dimensions of modern society. they may have had a role in formation of those nations, but so did germany, france, portugal, etc. sure, the british were the king of colonies but the one that had the most contribution to modern society? not in my opinion... romans did.


How exactly did you come to that conclusion? When Rome fell, so did it's technology and most of it's contributions. Britain's contributions can be seen all the time. Like calculus, the industrial revolution.

And it was bigger than Rome's. That's factual:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:British_Empire_1897.jpg
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:LocationRomanEmpire.png


read post above: mongols

Turkish
04-27-2006, 11:37 AM
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:Mongol_dominions1.jpg

Turkish
04-27-2006, 11:38 AM
The Mongol Empire (Cyrillic: ?? ?????? ???) (1206?1368) was the largest contiguous (the land streched uninterrupted by borders or stretches of water) land empire in world history, ruling 35 million kmē (13.8 million milesē) and more than 100 million people.

:)

Legend
04-27-2006, 11:42 AM
To be honest I did not know the Mongolians had that much land. Blame US public schools, and the History Channel's obsession with WWII.

However, to be fair the British ruled the seas, and there's still large areas of land of people that still associate themselves with British culture (Australia, New Zealand, Canada, etc).

Turkish
04-27-2006, 11:45 AM
Originally posted by: Legend

Originally posted by: Turkish

Originally posted by: tynopik
as far as contributing to the modern state of the world, it is quite easy: britain

they had the largest empire OF ALL TIME

plus america is as it is because of the influence of british values

also think partition of india and pakistan, formation of israel, shape of modern middle east, australia being 'europe south', europe not being run by germany or russia

britain has had a huge impact on the shape of the world today


no they didn't.


and also, those things that you mention are not the social dimensions of modern society. they may have had a role in formation of those nations, but so did germany, france, portugal, etc. sure, the british were the king of colonies but the one that had the most contribution to modern society? not in my opinion... romans did.


How exactly did you come to that conclusion? When Rome fell, so did it's technology and most of it's contributions. Britain's contributions can be seen all the time. Like calculus, the industrial revolution.

And it was bigger than Rome's. That's factual:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:British_Empire_1897.jpg
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:LocationRomanEmpire.png


calculus is not a british contribution

Turkish
04-27-2006, 11:47 AM
Originally posted by: Legend
To be honest I did not know the Mongolians had that much land. Blame US public schools, and the History Channel's obsession with WWII.

However, to be fair the British ruled the seas, and there's still large areas of land of people that still associate themselves with British culture (Australia, New Zealand, Canada, etc).

cool cool... we learned quite a bit about the mongols in turkey as they have similar roots...

Legend
04-27-2006, 11:48 AM
Isaac Newton contributed a lot to Calculus. More than Roman Numerals would ever get us in mathematics.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Isaac_Newton

Turkish
04-27-2006, 12:00 PM
Originally posted by: Legend
Isaac Newton contributed a lot to Calculus. More than Roman Numerals would ever get us in mathematics.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Isaac_Newton



the problem is, it wasn't the romans. it was the greeks. i am not denying newton's role in calculus... he did great things, such as linking calculus to everyday things but not find the fundamentals of calculus ;)

tynopik
04-27-2006, 12:29 PM
Originally posted by: Turkish
The Mongol Empire (Cyrillic: ?? ?????? ???) (1206?1368) was the largest contiguous (the land streched uninterrupted by borders or stretches of water) land empire in world history, ruling 35 million kmē (13.8 million milesē) and more than 100 million people.

:)



from wikipedia:

"By 1921 the British Empire held sway over a population of about 470?570 million people; approximately a quarter of the world's population. It covered about 14.3 million square miles (more than 37 million kmē), about a quarter of the world's total land area"

britain was slightly larger in total area (by 0.5 million sq mi) and 5 times as many people

Turkish
04-27-2006, 12:38 PM
Originally posted by: tynopik

Originally posted by: Turkish
The Mongol Empire (Cyrillic: ?? ?????? ???) (1206?1368) was the largest contiguous (the land streched uninterrupted by borders or stretches of water) land empire in world history, ruling 35 million kmē (13.8 million milesē) and more than 100 million people.

:)



from wikipedia:

"By 1921 the British Empire held sway over a population of about 470?570 million people; approximately a quarter of the world's population. It covered about 14.3 million square miles (more than 37 million kmē), about a quarter of the world's total land area"

britain was slightly larger in total area (by 0.5 million sq mi) and 5 times as many people

The problem with that calculation is the term British Empire includes many lands that had no constitutional link to the land of Britain. Mongols had full political and military control over the land mapped above. Australia for example was delinked from Britain's constitution in early 1900s and was a commonwealth (as in nation, not state).

Kadarin
04-27-2006, 12:43 PM
I think it's pretty safe to rule out current Islamic culture...

Turkish
04-27-2006, 12:50 PM
Originally posted by: Astaroth33
I think it's pretty safe to rule out current Islamic culture...

Don't be so sure. The modern science of medicine is largely credited to Avicenna, a Persian... there are many more actually.

Edit: Nevermind, you said current :)

TXHokie
04-27-2006, 12:55 PM
America - invented ketchup. 'nuff said

Turkish
04-27-2006, 01:03 PM
Originally posted by: TXHokie
America - invented ketchup. 'nuff said

lol. you a Hokie too? :)

Skyclad1uhm1
04-28-2006, 01:41 AM
Originally posted by: TXHokie
America - invented ketchup. 'nuff said

Nope, China did! (http://mimi.essortment.com/historyketchup_rlju.htm) :D

thunderhorse
04-28-2006, 04:05 PM
Romans...... For sure

jai6638
04-28-2006, 04:12 PM
Indians in math & science ( including medicine )

newbiepcuser
04-28-2006, 04:12 PM
China with about 1,313,973,713 contributions.

imported_Trippin315
04-28-2006, 04:13 PM
How 'bout the big G-Man upstairs

JS80
04-28-2006, 04:15 PM
Jews and GWB

EatSpam
04-28-2006, 04:25 PM
Originally posted by: Trippin315
How 'bout the big G-Man upstairs


who?

Quasmo
04-28-2006, 04:34 PM
Originally posted by: necine
Romans.

QFT!