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Syringer
08-11-2004, 02:13 PM
When temperatures are listed, they're taken in the shade right? But how much warmer would the temps be while directly in the sun?

pyonir
08-11-2004, 02:14 PM
when you live in Phoenix, it's a LOT warmer.

PingSpike
08-11-2004, 02:14 PM
directly in the sun the temps are upwards of 10,000 degrees.

Ryan
08-11-2004, 02:15 PM
I'd say usually 5-10 degrees on a hot day.

notfred
08-11-2004, 02:16 PM
Depends. asphalt gets hotter than grass does. An unheated pool in the sun is probably cooler most of the time than the air in the shade. etc...

neutralizer
08-11-2004, 02:19 PM
Some weather sites list a in sun and shade temp.

vi edit
08-11-2004, 02:22 PM
Originally posted by: pyonir
when you live in Phoenix, it's a LOT warmer.

Ditto ^ 10

woowoo
08-11-2004, 02:26 PM
The National Weather Service takes it's temps in full sun.
There are too many spiders in the shade to get a good reading.

DrPizza
08-11-2004, 02:50 PM
Originally posted by: Syringer
But how much warmer would the temps be while directly in the sun?

The air temperature would be pretty much the same, unless the temperature in the sun was taken over an object, such as black asphalt, that has been heated by absorbing the suns rays and is radiating heat.

If you are over a grassy field, and take the temp 4 or 5 feet above the ground, then move to the shade next to the grassy field and again take the temperature 4 or 5 feet above the ground, the temperatures will be nearly equal.

It will *feel* warmer in the sun though because the suns rays will be absorbed by your skin, causing your skin to warm. It's not the air temperature that's different, it's your body absorbing the radiation from the sun that makes it feel warmer.

However, if you're talking about an extensive area that's shaded, with little or no breeze, then the air may be a bit cooler in the shade because of the decrease in radiational heating from surfaces no longer directly warmed by the suns rays, and the little bit that the air is heated from the sun. (If you think the air is significantly heated by the sun, then why is the air cooler as you increase in altitude to where the suns rays are more intense?)

apac
08-11-2004, 02:51 PM
I think altitude also makes a difference. The sun feels A LOT hotter here in Colorado than it did when I lived in NY.

bradruth
08-11-2004, 02:54 PM
Originally posted by: woowoo
There are too many spiders in the shade to get a good reading.

:confused:

Syringer
08-11-2004, 03:00 PM
Originally posted by: DrPizza

Originally posted by: Syringer
But how much warmer would the temps be while directly in the sun?

The air temperature would be pretty much the same, unless the temperature in the sun was taken over an object, such as black asphalt, that has been heated by absorbing the suns rays and is radiating heat.

If you are over a grassy field, and take the temp 4 or 5 feet above the ground, then move to the shade next to the grassy field and again take the temperature 4 or 5 feet above the ground, the temperatures will be nearly equal.

It will *feel* warmer in the sun though because the suns rays will be absorbed by your skin, causing your skin to warm. It's not the air temperature that's different, it's your body absorbing the radiation from the sun that makes it feel warmer.

However, if you're talking about an extensive area that's shaded, with little or no breeze, then the air may be a bit cooler in the shade because of the decrease in radiational heating from surfaces no longer directly warmed by the suns rays, and the little bit that the air is heated from the sun. (If you think the air is significantly heated by the sun, then why is the air cooler as you increase in altitude to where the suns rays are more intense?)

Basically what I'm asking is that if you have a thermometer in the shade, and one in the sun..how much warmer will the reading in the sun be? Because clearly it would feel warmer in the sun than it does in the shade.

DrPizza
08-11-2004, 04:58 PM
Originally posted by: Syringer

Originally posted by: DrPizza

Originally posted by: Syringer
But how much warmer would the temps be while directly in the sun?

The air temperature would be pretty much the same, unless the temperature in the sun was taken over an object, such as black asphalt, that has been heated by absorbing the suns rays and is radiating heat.

If you are over a grassy field, and take the temp 4 or 5 feet above the ground, then move to the shade next to the grassy field and again take the temperature 4 or 5 feet above the ground, the temperatures will be nearly equal.

It will *feel* warmer in the sun though because the suns rays will be absorbed by your skin, causing your skin to warm. It's not the air temperature that's different, it's your body absorbing the radiation from the sun that makes it feel warmer.

However, if you're talking about an extensive area that's shaded, with little or no breeze, then the air may be a bit cooler in the shade because of the decrease in radiational heating from surfaces no longer directly warmed by the suns rays, and the little bit that the air is heated from the sun. (If you think the air is significantly heated by the sun, then why is the air cooler as you increase in altitude to where the suns rays are more intense?)

Basically what I'm asking is that if you have a thermometer in the shade, and one in the sun..how much warmer will the reading in the sun be? Because clearly it would feel warmer in the sun than it does in the shade.

The readings would be about the same.

Bootprint
08-11-2004, 05:04 PM
Some of those gauges are in Boxes (http://comp.uark.edu/~dtjohnso/weatherbox.jpg).

Iron Woode
08-11-2004, 05:09 PM
Originally posted by: woowoo
There are too many spiders in the shade to get a good reading.
LOL

AccruedExpenditure
08-11-2004, 06:53 PM
Originally posted by: Iron Woode

Originally posted by: woowoo
There are too many spiders in the shade to get a good reading.
LOL

:thumbsup:

Slacker
08-11-2004, 08:06 PM
Check out this chart on heat indices Like "wind chill factor" but for heat (http://members.cox.net/slacker./spider2.JPG)

faenix
08-11-2004, 08:11 PM
Spiderman has been posting a lot of new threads lately.

:D