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homestarmy
11-18-2007, 01:50 PM
Hey all, I was wondering if you smart people might be interested in helping me figure out approximately how much it would cost to cook a turkey in an electric oven. I googled and can't seem to find an answer and I'm curious. I know that cooking things in the oven can take a hell of a lot of electricity.

First, we would need to make assumptions, such as the size of the turkey. I don't know off the top of my head what the standard size generally is, but if anyone can come up with a size, temperature and tell how long it would be cooked for, we would then need to figure out how much power it would pull to get the oven to that temperature.

At that point, we'd have the energy used from the electric company, and would just need to figure how much is spent per kWh which is easy to find.

Any help? Thaaaanks! :)

Scouzer
11-18-2007, 01:52 PM
$10 at worst

alkemyst
11-18-2007, 02:13 PM
I seriously hope you aren't splitting costs with your guests.

Rubycon
11-18-2007, 02:13 PM
First you need to know the draw of the bottom element in your oven. You can attach an Amprobe onto one of the legs (L1 or L2) at your service entrance. Most residential circuits in the USA for kitchen stoves are 50A 240VAC.

Do keep in mind that you will probably be using stove top burners along with the oven so if you go by total draw on your stove circuit it will skew the results of $/turkey cooking period! ;)

altonb1
11-18-2007, 02:19 PM
Originally posted by: alkemyst
I seriously hope you aren't splitting costs with your guests.

Cheap Bastard FTL

montypythizzle
11-18-2007, 02:33 PM
Originally posted by: alkemyst
I seriously hope you aren't splitting costs with your guests.

Why not? :D

josh0099
11-18-2007, 02:38 PM
Originally posted by: Scouzer
$10 at worst

probably more like $2 at the worst...

cornbread
11-18-2007, 02:40 PM
why do you really care how much it takes?

drnickriviera
11-18-2007, 02:43 PM
Bake elements will run around 2000 watts. So worst case. 2000watts @ 4hrs = 8kwh * 10cents/kwh = a whopping 80 cents

Anubis
11-18-2007, 02:43 PM
turkey fryers use no electricity :D

Rubycon
11-18-2007, 02:47 PM
Originally posted by: drnickriviera
Bake elements will run around 2000 watts. So worst case. 2000watts @ 4hrs = 8kwh * 10cents/kwh = a whopping 80 cents

Most lower elements are 3kW and the broiler (upper) element is 2.75kW (not used in baking). 4 hours is probably a good round figure for the average stuffed turkey of 15 pounds. 23 pound monsters are going to be close to six hours. ;)

Originally posted by: Anubis
turkey fryers use no electricity :D

Sure but they have 250mbh burners running on LPG. ;)

Whatever you do, if you have a self cleaning oven don't hit CLEAN. :laugh:

imported_LoKe
11-18-2007, 02:48 PM
Originally posted by: Scouzer
$10 at worst

$10 if you intend to cook a person, perhaps.

preCRT
11-18-2007, 03:04 PM
Originally posted by: homestarmy
Hey all, I was wondering if you smart people might be interested in helping me figure out approximately how much it would cost to cook a turkey in an electric oven. I googled and can't seem to find an answer and I'm curious. I know that cooking things in the oven can take a hell of a lot of electricity.

First, we would need to make assumptions, such as the size of the turkey. I don't know off the top of my head what the standard size generally is, but if anyone can come up with a size...

That's easy, a turkey is about the size of an alternator :D

FoBoT
11-18-2007, 03:08 PM
you cares
use all the electricity you need to

jagec
11-18-2007, 03:13 PM
Originally posted by: Rubycon

Whatever you do, if you have a self cleaning oven don't hit CLEAN. :laugh:

But the instructions said "clean the turkey", and the oven had a setting for "clean"!

spidey07
11-18-2007, 03:15 PM
Originally posted by: drnickriviera
Bake elements will run around 2000 watts. So worst case. 2000watts @ 4hrs = 8kwh * 10cents/kwh = a whopping 80 cents

A lot less than that, the elements aren't on full blast all the time.

ConstipatedVigilante
11-18-2007, 03:16 PM
Are you honestly worried about how much it will cost? You already had to pay for the turkey if you're cooking it...

Freejack2
11-18-2007, 03:29 PM
Google is your friend.
From: http://www.clarkpublicutilitie.../Archives2007/07_11_11 (http://www.clarkpublicutilities.com/Residential/TheEnergyAdviser/Archives2007/07_11_11)

But the amount of energy used to cook the meal isn?t large enough to be meaningful in choosing between cooking methods. The cost to cook an 8- to 10-pound turkey in an electric oven at 350 degrees is about 15 cents at today?s rates. You?ll probably spend $3 to $4 for propane if you decide to barbecue or deep-fry your turkey.

Kaido
11-18-2007, 03:30 PM
Kill-a-watt?

Eli
11-18-2007, 03:39 PM
Originally posted by: Rubycon
Originally posted by: drnickriviera
Bake elements will run around 2000 watts. So worst case. 2000watts @ 4hrs = 8kwh * 10cents/kwh = a whopping 80 cents

Most lower elements are 3kW and the broiler (upper) element is 2.75kW (not used in baking). 4 hours is probably a good round figure for the average stuffed turkey of 15 pounds. 23 pound monsters are going to be close to six hours. ;)

Originally posted by: Anubis
turkey fryers use no electricity :D

Sure but they have 250mbh burners running on LPG. ;)

Whatever you do, if you have a self cleaning oven don't hit CLEAN. :laugh:I'm pretty certain that the broil element is active while baking, it just doesn't glow. At least in my oven.

But yeah, the electricity costs are going to be pretty small.

pray4mojo
11-18-2007, 03:46 PM
tell me how much it weighs and the specific heat of the turkey and ill tell you.

Engineer
11-18-2007, 03:47 PM
Originally posted by: Rubycon
Originally posted by: drnickriviera
Bake elements will run around 2000 watts. So worst case. 2000watts @ 4hrs = 8kwh * 10cents/kwh = a whopping 80 cents

Most lower elements are 3kW and the broiler (upper) element is 2.75kW (not used in baking). 4 hours is probably a good round figure for the average stuffed turkey of 15 pounds. 23 pound monsters are going to be close to six hours. ;)

Originally posted by: Anubis
turkey fryers use no electricity :D

Sure but they have 250mbh burners running on LPG. ;)

Whatever you do, if you have a self cleaning oven don't hit CLEAN. :laugh:

And most burners, once up to heat, are on less than 25% of the time so the 4 to 6 hours would be much less in actual element on time.

Let's say 3,000 watts. That, in Lexington, KY, would be approximately 18 cents per hour. I would guess it would take about 60 cents (at most) to cook a turkey.

SsupernovaE
11-18-2007, 03:59 PM
Financial woes? Perhaps 50 of us could PayPal you 2 each to cover the electricity costs for a happy Turkey Day.

mrSHEiK124
11-18-2007, 04:04 PM
Originally posted by: SsupernovaE
Financial woes? Perhaps 50 of us could PayPal you 2 each to cover the electricity costs for a happy Turkey Day.

With fees I don't think 2 cents ends up netting the recipient anything :P

BlackTigers
11-18-2007, 04:11 PM
Originally posted by: Kaido
Kill-a-watt?

If they make one that fits on a 220 outlet... :P

SsupernovaE
11-18-2007, 04:14 PM
Originally posted by: mrSHEiK124
Originally posted by: SsupernovaE
Financial woes? Perhaps 50 of us could PayPal you 2 each to cover the electricity costs for a happy Turkey Day.

With fees I don't think 2 cents ends up netting the recipient anything :P

You're right. It's going to be a sad, sad Turkey Day for OP :brokenheart:

Hyperlite
11-18-2007, 04:15 PM
Originally posted by: LoKe
Originally posted by: Scouzer
$10 at worst

$10 if you intend to cook a person, perhaps.

well, yeah! wtf do you cook for thanksgiving? ;)

Evadman
11-18-2007, 04:27 PM
I measured the lunch I made at a friends house on his electric oven. It was 3 oncor lasagnas at 2 lbs each, 6 total lbs which would be a pretty small turkey. According to the meter on the side of the house, slightly less than 5 kwh were used during the 74 minutes for the entire house. At 8.83 cents per kwh, that comes to 44.15 cents. Since we were using other things like lights in the basement and a electric compressor, the cost to took was probably in the 10 cent range.

Rubycon
11-18-2007, 04:30 PM
If you're that concerned just yank your meter and put a pair of hacksaw blades (cut to length and polished) across the socket. Do it for the long weekend and quit cold turkey. :P

Tiamat
11-18-2007, 04:37 PM
Probably 1$ of electricity for the entire meal. Since you are using the high powered units for only 5-6 hrs over the course of the month, the cost associated with running this is tiny compared to things that you leave on all the time, for example, a computer ($20 per month), or especially, the refrigerator (20-30$ per month).

0roo0roo
11-18-2007, 05:14 PM
Originally posted by: Kaido
Kill-a-watt?

would work with some soldering, but i think large appliances use 240v so fried it would be:)

Eli
11-18-2007, 06:11 PM
Originally posted by: Tiamat
Probably 1$ of electricity for the entire meal. Since you are using the high powered units for only 5-6 hrs over the course of the month, the cost associated with running this is tiny compared to things that you leave on all the time, for example, a computer ($20 per month), or especially, the refrigerator (20-30$ per month).:laugh:

Where did you pull those figures? :P

My fridge uses ~8$/mo, and my computer uses 10$/mo... 12$ including the LCD.

Computer draws an average of ~140W, fridge draws 225W when its on.

I guess if you had one of those big double door fridges, it might be more. ;)

BrunoPuntzJones
11-18-2007, 06:25 PM
Originally posted by: pray4mojo
tell me how much it weighs and the specific heat of the turkey and ill tell you.

i laughed at this

Alistar7
11-18-2007, 06:29 PM
Be a man, eat it raw.

So
11-18-2007, 06:40 PM
Originally posted by: Rubycon
If you're that concerned just yank your meter and put a pair of hacksaw blades (cut to length and polished) across the socket. Do it for the long weekend and quit cold turkey. :P

God help us if he finds out how to screw with his power factor. :shocked:

imported_weadjust
11-18-2007, 06:54 PM
Call the Turkey Talk Line and ask them. Post thier answer.

1-800-Butterball

http://www.butterball.com/en/m...de&s1=Turkey_Talk_Line (http://www.butterball.com/en/main_canvas.jsp?includePage=holidayGuide_2007.jsp&t=Butterball_Holiday_Guide&s0=holidayGuide&s1=Turkey_Talk_Line)

ktehmok
11-18-2007, 07:49 PM
Originally posted by: homestarmy
Hey all, I was wondering if you smart people might be interested in helping me figure out approximately how much it would cost to cook a turkey in an electric oven. I googled and can't seem to find an answer and I'm curious. I know that cooking things in the oven can take a hell of a lot of electricity.

First, we would need to make assumptions, such as the size of the turkey. I don't know off the top of my head what the standard size generally is, but if anyone can come up with a size, temperature and tell how long it would be cooked for, we would then need to figure out how much power it would pull to get the oven to that temperature.

At that point, we'd have the energy used from the electric company, and would just need to figure how much is spent per kWh which is easy to find.

Any help? Thaaaanks! :)

I have M-Power through the local electric utility here. It is basically pre-paid electric. You insert a card into a machine & prepay whatever amount you wish. It is great at helping you conserver power, believe me.

Last Thanksgiving Day, I had $2.80 of credit on my card at 6am (Not the greatest planning on my part, but whatever). I cooked an entire meal w/ entre's etc and didn't have to go refill the card until that evening.

Short story: it doesn't take that much.