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bladder23
11-12-2007, 10:03 PM
By being able to do more pushups, does that equate into more strength?

In other words, does doing lots of pushups increase strength at all? or just muscle endurance?

Edit:

120 lbs
5'8
Can do 55 pushups consecutively

Have a gym membership. Need you guys to recommend me how to get triceps, biceps and abs. (Currently pushups, chinups, situps)

Moved from Off Topic
moderator allisolm

Injury
11-12-2007, 10:06 PM
Pushups are more or less worthless in terms of losing weight/gaining muscle.

AFAIK, more pushups just equals a higher threshhold for doing more pushups.

halik
11-12-2007, 10:07 PM
unless theres someone sitting on your back, you're just burning calories

Phokus
11-12-2007, 10:09 PM
What the hell are you guys talking about? Of course it increases strength... unless you weight nothing. If you can do pushups with ease, just have someone sit on you or put some weights on your back...

thepd7
11-12-2007, 10:11 PM
Originally posted by: halik
unless theres someone sitting on your back, you're just burning calories

Depends on where you are at right now in pectoral strength. If you have weak pecs then pushups will build muscle, if you have a strong pecs it won't do much.

As for me, I weigh 185 pounds, I bench around 160. Push ups give me a pretty good pec workout. Not great, but it's better than nothing if I am not around a gym. My pecs are really weak though.

bladder23
11-12-2007, 10:13 PM
Originally posted by: halik
unless theres someone sitting on your back, you're just burning calories

:o

You mean Ive been doing nothing for the past 2 months but get skinnier?

Special K
11-12-2007, 10:14 PM
Originally posted by: bladder23
Originally posted by: halik
unless theres someone sitting on your back, you're just burning calories

:o

You mean Ive been doing nothing for the past 2 months but get skinnier?

If you want to get bigger, you need to hit the big compound lifts - bench, squat, row, deadlift, pullups, dips, etc.

Oh yea, and eat a ton of healthy food ;)

Coquito
11-12-2007, 10:16 PM
I can pump out a nice chunk of pushups, but besides some stiffness in my chest cavity & an increased ability to do more pushups, it doesn't seem to be doing much.

tfinch2
11-12-2007, 10:16 PM
Yes it does equal more strength. I am stronger if I can do 30 pushups compared to 15 push ups.

TehMac
11-12-2007, 10:21 PM
Hey guys, all this talk of diet has got me wondering: is this good:

My usual diet:

Mashed taters (lots of butter), plus brocchili + occasional salad + lots of butter on taters + roast/chicken or if weekends, Brotwurst, Steak, chicken (ocasionally, if there's no steak) all BBQ'd + taters and vegetables. Maybe once ever week I have a lasagna that I could do without, but whatever.

How is that? Should I take supplements like creotine?

bladder23
11-12-2007, 10:21 PM
Isnt a push-up just like an upside-down bench press?

edit: but with less weight

UncleWai
11-12-2007, 10:21 PM
Triangle push-up is really nice, but quite straining on the joints.
I really prefer wide grip pull ups over push ups for results.
You won't get bulk like you would with weight training, but you get tone definition.

KnickNut3
11-12-2007, 10:23 PM
Both, obviously. If you're weak, it'll build strength more. If you're strong and can do 50 already, it'll build endurance. Any resistance excercise does both. How there are such a wide range of answers here is beyond me.

Special K
11-12-2007, 10:26 PM
Originally posted by: TehMac
Hey guys, all this talk of diet has got me wondering: is this good:

My usual diet:

Mashed taters (lots of butter), plus brocchili + occasional salad + lots of butter on taters + roast/chicken or if weekends, Brotwurst, Steak, chicken (ocasionally, if there's no steak) all BBQ'd + taters and vegetables. Maybe once ever week I have a lasagna that I could do without, but whatever.

How is that? Should I take supplements like creotine?

That diet looks like mostly fat to me, especially when you say "lots of butter". I don't see a lot of protein in there. I'm not sure what your goals are though. Compared to the average person, it might be pretty good ;) However, since you mentioned creatine, I would say from a muscle-building standpoint, it's pretty poor.

You should definitely not take any supplements until you get your diet in order.

SludgeFactory
11-12-2007, 10:30 PM
It'll increase strength to a point, pushups alone aren't going to get you to a 300 lb benchpress.

When you need to change things up try different hand positions, different angle of inclination, add a weighted backpack, etc. It's a good exercise, it activates a lot of muscles in the torso, even some abs/low back.

Balt
11-12-2007, 10:33 PM
Originally posted by: TehMac
Hey guys, all this talk of diet has got me wondering: is this good:

My usual diet:

Mashed taters (lots of butter), plus brocchili + occasional salad + lots of butter on taters + roast/chicken or if weekends, Brotwurst, Steak, chicken (ocasionally, if there's no steak) all BBQ'd + taters and vegetables. Maybe once ever week I have a lasagna that I could do without, but whatever.

How is that? Should I take supplements like creotine?

Why would you think that mashed potatoes with lots of butter is a good thing? :confused:

TehMac
11-12-2007, 10:35 PM
Originally posted by: Special K
Originally posted by: TehMac
Hey guys, all this talk of diet has got me wondering: is this good:

My usual diet:

Mashed taters (lots of butter), plus brocchili + occasional salad + lots of butter on taters + roast/chicken or if weekends, Brotwurst, Steak, chicken (ocasionally, if there's no steak) all BBQ'd + taters and vegetables. Maybe once ever week I have a lasagna that I could do without, but whatever.

How is that? Should I take supplements like creotine?

That diet looks like mostly fat to me, especially when you say "lots of butter". I don't see a lot of protein in there. I'm not sure what your goals are though. Compared to the average person, it might be pretty good ;) However, since you mentioned creatine, I would say from a muscle-building standpoint, it's pretty poor.

You should definitely not take any supplements until you get your diet in order.

Ok, not butter, but healthy margarine. The meat is really the main course, with taters (and vegetables) as a supporting dish.

Originally posted by: Balt

Why would you think that mashed potatoes with lots of butter is a good thing? :confused:

I like eating taters with butter. I don't drown em out in butter, but I like using a lot, especially for baked taters.

Mo0o
11-12-2007, 10:39 PM
Originally posted by: TehMac
Originally posted by: Special K
Originally posted by: TehMac
Hey guys, all this talk of diet has got me wondering: is this good:

My usual diet:

Mashed taters (lots of butter), plus brocchili + occasional salad + lots of butter on taters + roast/chicken or if weekends, Brotwurst, Steak, chicken (ocasionally, if there's no steak) all BBQ'd + taters and vegetables. Maybe once ever week I have a lasagna that I could do without, but whatever.

How is that? Should I take supplements like creotine?

That diet looks like mostly fat to me, especially when you say "lots of butter". I don't see a lot of protein in there. I'm not sure what your goals are though. Compared to the average person, it might be pretty good ;) However, since you mentioned creatine, I would say from a muscle-building standpoint, it's pretty poor.

You should definitely not take any supplements until you get your diet in order.

Ok, not butter, but healthy margarine. The meat is really the main course, with taters (and vegetables) as a supporting dish.

Originally posted by: Balt

Why would you think that mashed potatoes with lots of butter is a good thing? :confused:

I like eating taters with butter. I don't drown em out in butter, but I like using a lot, especially for baked taters.

potatoes give very little in terms of nutrition, especially if you load it with butter/sour cream/bacon etc. If you want to build muscle, you need to eat a lot of lean meat like chicken breast.

Lasagna? hahahahaha. And what kind of dressing do you use with the salads?

Special K
11-12-2007, 10:41 PM
Originally posted by: Mo0o
Originally posted by: TehMac
Originally posted by: Special K
Originally posted by: TehMac
Hey guys, all this talk of diet has got me wondering: is this good:

My usual diet:

Mashed taters (lots of butter), plus brocchili + occasional salad + lots of butter on taters + roast/chicken or if weekends, Brotwurst, Steak, chicken (ocasionally, if there's no steak) all BBQ'd + taters and vegetables. Maybe once ever week I have a lasagna that I could do without, but whatever.

How is that? Should I take supplements like creotine?

That diet looks like mostly fat to me, especially when you say "lots of butter". I don't see a lot of protein in there. I'm not sure what your goals are though. Compared to the average person, it might be pretty good ;) However, since you mentioned creatine, I would say from a muscle-building standpoint, it's pretty poor.

You should definitely not take any supplements until you get your diet in order.

Ok, not butter, but healthy margarine. The meat is really the main course, with taters (and vegetables) as a supporting dish.

Originally posted by: Balt

Why would you think that mashed potatoes with lots of butter is a good thing? :confused:

I like eating taters with butter. I don't drown em out in butter, but I like using a lot, especially for baked taters.

potatoes give very little in terms of nutrition, especially if you load it with butter/sour cream/bacon etc. If you want to build muscle, you need to eat a lot of lean meat like chicken breast.

Lasagna? hahahahaha. And what kind of dressing do you use with the salads?



Yeah, I'm going to go with Mo0o on this one - your diet still isn't all that great, and you still haven't said what your goals are.

If you want to see how it all breaks down in terms of calories, protein, fat, and carbs, enter a typical day's diet here:

fitday (http://www.fitday.com)

TehMac
11-12-2007, 10:45 PM
I'm into muscle building, simply put. Building biceps, triceps, pecs, etc.

Trying to tone down my stomach, make it a little less protruding. I weigh 165, am 6' now.



I don't have any dressing with salad. The Lasagna was a liberal estimate, probably every 2 weeks or so. It's hard to say.

imported_LoKe
11-12-2007, 10:49 PM
This is a funny thread. Pushups and situps are two of the greatest exercises you can do at home if you have no gym equipment. Now, that's not to say that you'll be ripped all over, but it will definitely help. Hell, even for cardio and building up your endurance, it's worth it.

Special K
11-12-2007, 10:51 PM
Originally posted by: TehMac
I'm into muscle building, simply put. Building biceps, triceps, pecs, etc.

Trying to tone down my stomach, make it a little less protruding. I weigh 165, am 6' now.



I don't have any dressing with salad. The Lasagna was a liberal estimate, probably every 2 weeks or so. It's hard to say.

Your diet could still be improved quite a bit, and if you want to lose fat, you would be best off tracking what you ate anyway.

Mo0o
11-12-2007, 10:53 PM
if a regulat pushup routine is too easy, try a backpack of weights/books.

TehMac
11-12-2007, 11:08 PM
Originally posted by: Special K
Originally posted by: TehMac
I'm into muscle building, simply put. Building biceps, triceps, pecs, etc.

Trying to tone down my stomach, make it a little less protruding. I weigh 165, am 6' now.



I don't have any dressing with salad. The Lasagna was a liberal estimate, probably every 2 weeks or so. It's hard to say.

Your diet could still be improved quite a bit, and if you want to lose fat, you would be best off tracking what you ate anyway.

I dont want to run myself into a skinny dude, I just want to turn it into muscle. Imo, situps are good for that, problem is, I don't have much time anymore.

destrekor
11-12-2007, 11:11 PM
Originally posted by: UncleWai
Triangle push-up is really nice, but quite straining on the joints.
I really prefer wide grip pull ups over push ups for results.
You won't get bulk like you would with weight training, but you get tone definition.

diamond pushups are really bad for the shoulders.
you can get pretty much the same thing though, by just doing regular close-hand pushups.
But do a variety. Do wide-arm, regular interval, and close-hand (have one-hands width inbetween both hands, thumbs pointing straight toward each other and touching, making what appears to be a box shape).
But yes, you definitely want to do more than push ups. On their own they will only get you so far.

destrekor
11-12-2007, 11:15 PM
Originally posted by: TehMac
Originally posted by: Special K
Originally posted by: TehMac
I'm into muscle building, simply put. Building biceps, triceps, pecs, etc.

Trying to tone down my stomach, make it a little less protruding. I weigh 165, am 6' now.



I don't have any dressing with salad. The Lasagna was a liberal estimate, probably every 2 weeks or so. It's hard to say.

Your diet could still be improved quite a bit, and if you want to lose fat, you would be best off tracking what you ate anyway.

I dont want to run myself into a skinny dude, I just want to turn it into muscle. Imo, situps are good for that, problem is, I don't have much time anymore.

if you don't eat right, you won't provide the necessary nutrients to do any of that. You need protein to recover (if all your doing is cardio and pushups/situps, you don't need a lot, just a good daily amount), and the other food groups to balance out energy and, well I'd just be talking out my ass if I continued. lol I do know you need to eat right so that nutrient levels and balanced and allow your body to maintain peak performance (or provide the key step to getting there), but how exactly each nutrient and food group act individually on your ability to better yourself, I don't know. I probably should take a food/health management course.

Tylanner
11-12-2007, 11:21 PM
if your max reps are around 8-12 then yes

once you can max out at like 15-20+ push ups before being completely exhausted then you are just basically building endurance

CStan
11-12-2007, 11:22 PM
My routine consists of close-hand push ups, clapping pushups, pull ups/chin ups on my door gym, and curls with some dumb bells. I also do leg lifts and sit ups. For cardio, I play basketball or jog. I don't really take it too seriously, but I feel and look pretty fit.

As for pushups increasing strength, my close-hand and clapping pushups definitely increased the strength of my chest. 1 day I might invest in a bench with some weights, but I really like exercises that use your own body weight.

JD50
11-12-2007, 11:24 PM
Originally posted by: Injury
Pushups are more or less worthless in terms of losing weight/gaining muscle.

AFAIK, more pushups just equals a higher threshhold for doing more pushups.

I hope you're not serious.

Special K
11-12-2007, 11:26 PM
Originally posted by: JD50
Originally posted by: Injury
Pushups are more or less worthless in terms of losing weight/gaining muscle.

AFAIK, more pushups just equals a higher threshhold for doing more pushups.

I hope you're not serious.

You aren't going to build any serious amount of muscle by doing pushups unless you were malnourished to begin with. Even then, you would still have to be eating enough of the right foods to grow.

JD50
11-12-2007, 11:28 PM
Originally posted by: bladder23
By being able to do more pushups, does that equate into more strength?

In other words, does doing lots of pushups increase strength at all? or just muscle endurance?

Edit:

120 lbs
5'8
Can do 55 pushups consecutively

Have a gym membership. Need you guys to recommend me how to get triceps, biceps and abs. (Currently pushups, chinups, situps)

Go here, www.stewsmith.com (http://www.stewsmith.com/), buy this, The Complete Guide to Navy SEAL Fitness (http://getfitnow.stores.yahoo.net/comguidtonav.html) and follow the workout routine. You will be in better shape than anyone at the gym.

That will get you lean, cut and in phenomenal shape, if you want a lot of muscle mass stick to weights.

Cerpin Taxt
11-12-2007, 11:31 PM
Originally posted by: TehMac
Originally posted by: Special K
Originally posted by: TehMac
I'm into muscle building, simply put. Building biceps, triceps, pecs, etc.

Trying to tone down my stomach, make it a little less protruding. I weigh 165, am 6' now.



I don't have any dressing with salad. The Lasagna was a liberal estimate, probably every 2 weeks or so. It's hard to say.

Your diet could still be improved quite a bit, and if you want to lose fat, you would be best off tracking what you ate anyway.

I dont want to run myself into a skinny dude, I just want to turn it into muscle. Imo, situps are good for that, problem is, I don't have much time anymore.
In order to stimulate muscle growth, you need to progressively lift heavier and heavier weights.

When I work out, I do 5 warm-up sets, then 3 "heavy" sets per muscle group. A "heavy" set is defined as one in which I will reach failure at or before 6 reps, but not before 4 reps. If I can do 7 reps, I increase the weight. If I can't do 4, I'm lifting too heavy. I usually do 3 different compound lifts like this per muscle group, with 3 "heavy" sets per lift.

After you begin stimulating your muscles properly, then you need to supply them with the building blocks to repair themselves and grow. The cornerstone is protein, followed by quality fats (i.e. not trans fat or saturated fat) and complex carbohydrates (i.e. brown rice and whole wheat and oats, not white rice, refined semolina pasta, simple sugars).

The usual metric for protein consumption is 1-2g of protein per pound of body weight. If you weigh 165 and begin a heavy lifting program, 200g of protein a day would suit you well. I'd recommend procuring a steady supply of Optimum Nutrition Pro Complex Gainer (http://www.dpsnutrition.net/get_item_on409.htm). I drink 2 of those shakes a day.

JD50
11-12-2007, 11:32 PM
Originally posted by: Special K
Originally posted by: JD50
Originally posted by: Injury
Pushups are more or less worthless in terms of losing weight/gaining muscle.

AFAIK, more pushups just equals a higher threshhold for doing more pushups.

I hope you're not serious.

You aren't going to build any serious amount of muscle by doing pushups unless you were malnourished to begin with. Even then, you would still have to be eating enough of the right foods to grow.

Well yea, you aren't going to get huge doing tons of pushups and no weights, but saying "Pushups are more or less worthless in terms of losing weight/gaining muscle." is absolutely ridiculous. You will gain a lot of muscle and lose a lot of weight doing a good pushup, pullup, and situp routine, you will just be lean and cut, not bulky. Just because you can't bench 350 lbs doesn't mean that you don't have a ton of muscle, its just different.

Edit - to be clear, you have to do A LOT of pushups, pull ups, and sit ups. I'm not talking about just a couple sets of each.

Special K
11-12-2007, 11:49 PM
Originally posted by: JD50
Originally posted by: Special K
Originally posted by: JD50
Originally posted by: Injury
Pushups are more or less worthless in terms of losing weight/gaining muscle.

AFAIK, more pushups just equals a higher threshhold for doing more pushups.

I hope you're not serious.

You aren't going to build any serious amount of muscle by doing pushups unless you were malnourished to begin with. Even then, you would still have to be eating enough of the right foods to grow.

Well yea, you aren't going to get huge doing tons of pushups and no weights, but saying "Pushups are more or less worthless in terms of losing weight/gaining muscle." is absolutely ridiculous. You will gain a lot of muscleand lose a lot of weight doing a good pushup, pullup, and situp routine, you will just be lean and cut, not bulky. Just because you can't bench 350 lbs doesn't mean that you don't have a ton of muscle, its just different.
Edit - to be clear, you have to do A LOT of pushups, pull ups, and sit ups. I'm not talking about just a couple sets of each.

Your bolded statements confuse me. First you agree with me that you aren't going to get "huge" doing pushups. Then you say you will gain "a lot" of muscle by doing just pushups, pullups, and situps.

Finally, you say that just because you can't bench 350 lbs. doesn't mean you don't have "a ton" of muscle, it's "just different".

I am confused by your post because you seem to use several vague and contradictory terms. I guess it all depends on what your idea of "huge" or "a ton" is. As I said before, gaining any muscle at all is more a function of your diet than anything else. Doing pushups does not build a "different type" of muscle than any other lift. Muscle is muscle. As I said before, you are going to have a hard time building any muscle at all if your workout only consists of pushups, situps, and pullups, even if you are eating enough.

A workout consisting only of pushups, pullups, and crunches might allow you to lose fat, but only because of the amount of calories burned. If you burn slightly more calories than you consume over a long period of time, then you will lose fat. Also, losing fat while retaining muscle results in increased definition, which can certainly make one appear more muscular, even if they didn't actually gain any muscle.

JD50
11-13-2007, 12:13 AM
Originally posted by: Special K
Originally posted by: JD50
Originally posted by: Special K
Originally posted by: JD50
Originally posted by: Injury
Pushups are more or less worthless in terms of losing weight/gaining muscle.

AFAIK, more pushups just equals a higher threshhold for doing more pushups.

I hope you're not serious.

You aren't going to build any serious amount of muscle by doing pushups unless you were malnourished to begin with. Even then, you would still have to be eating enough of the right foods to grow.

Well yea, you aren't going to get huge doing tons of pushups and no weights, but saying "Pushups are more or less worthless in terms of losing weight/gaining muscle." is absolutely ridiculous. You will gain a lot of muscleand lose a lot of weight doing a good pushup, pullup, and situp routine, you will just be lean and cut, not bulky. Just because you can't bench 350 lbs doesn't mean that you don't have a ton of muscle, its just different.
Edit - to be clear, you have to do A LOT of pushups, pull ups, and sit ups. I'm not talking about just a couple sets of each.

Your bolded statements confuse me. First you agree with me that you aren't going to get "huge" doing pushups. Then you say you will gain "a lot" of muscle by doing just pushups, pullups, and situps.

Finally, you say that just because you can't bench 350 lbs. doesn't mean you don't have "a ton" of muscle, it's "just different".

I am confused by your post because you seem to use several vague and contradictory terms. I guess it all depends on what your idea of "huge" or "a ton" is. As I said before, gaining any muscle at all is more a function of your diet than anything else. Doing pushups does not build a "different type" of muscle than any other lift. Muscle is muscle. As I said before, you are going to have a hard time building any muscle at all if your workout only consists of pushups, situps, and pullups, even if you are eating enough.

A workout consisting only of pushups, pullups, and crunches might allow you to lose fat, but only because of the amount of calories burned. If you burn slightly more calories than you consume over a long period of time, then you will lose fat. Also, losing fat while retaining muscle results in increased definition, which can certainly make one appear more muscular, even if they didn't actually gain any muscle.

My point was, just because you aren't huge doesn't mean that you don't have a lot of muscle. Yes, pushups do build a different type of muscle than maxing out on a bench press. Push ups build fast twitch muscle fibers while heavy weights build slow twitch muscle fibers. You will build a lot of muscle using a good push up, pull up, sit up routine, you just won't look like a body builder.

Maybe I am misunderstanding you, but are you saying that you won't gain a lot of muscle from doing heavy calisthenic routines? I don't think that special forces and SEALs use primarily calisthenics in their training to burn calories and increase definition....

I'm definitely not an expert here, but I used to be very big into calisthenics. I could do a lot more push ups than my friends that were into weights, but I couldn't bench for shit.

Injury
11-13-2007, 06:16 AM
Originally posted by: JD50
I'm definitely not an expert here, but I used to be very big into calisthenics. I could do a lot more push ups than my friends that were into weights, but I couldn't bench for shit.

So what you are saying is that doing lots of pushups only gives you a higher threshold for doing more pushups? ;)


MY point is that if you wake up in the morning and do even 100 pushups... even if it's everyday... you aren't going to notice a significant change in your physique unless you look over a longer timeline than if you did a full routine at the gym and ate foods that were beneficial to your goals.

IamBusby
11-13-2007, 06:27 AM
But it's still going to both increase muscle and burn calories. To say it's almost worthless is clearly not true.

The fact that you can do more pushups the more you do prove you are increasing your muscle power. How else do you think you can do more after a few weeks of doing just pushups?

PlatinumGold
11-13-2007, 06:30 AM
Originally posted by: LoKe
This is a funny thread. Pushups and situps are two of the greatest exercises you can do at home if you have no gym equipment. Now, that's not to say that you'll be ripped all over, but it will definitely help. Hell, even for cardio and building up your endurance, it's worth it.

herschel walker almost never went to the gym, he did thousands of pushups / situps every day.

he was a beast

skace
11-13-2007, 06:33 AM
First off, anyone can come in here and say they do 50 pushups. Are you doing 50 correct pushups? How is your form? Do you go all the way to the floor? Do you keep your body straight? Do you bend? Do you take your time or do you rush through them as fast as you can? Do you do them at an incline? Have you tried?

I hate when 1 person says they do 50 pushups and then other people try and prescribe advice based on that.

Now, the other obvious thing is that you weigh 120 pounds, pushups are based around benching your weight, which is a good thing. But if you are tiny and don't have any fat or real muscle definition then it is going to be easy for you to get to a point where you can bench what you weigh. This doesn't mean pushups are going to do nothing for a 300 pound overweight man, who can most likely work several years off of pushups and still be gaining benefits. There are things you can do to make a pushup harder for your 120lb ass though. Like others say, use an incline, use weights, use proper form, do compound exercises that utilize pushups as part of the routine, use dumbbells during your pushup, etc. There are a million different pushup exercises because it is a really good base to work from.

KarmaPolice
11-13-2007, 07:47 AM
I am working out 4 out of 7 days of the week now. I am feeling pretty good now, even though I haven't really lost a lot of weight, I was 169, and now I am 152 pounds, I think I am getting skinnier. (I am 5'9").

I think push ups are good. When I started at the beginning of the semester I could do like 8 and push myself to to do 10. Now I can do 30 (with good form), but after that I gotta take a rest to do anymore. I do kickboxing on tuesdays and thursdays which is a mix of things like pushups, pull ups, sit ups, and so forth, followed by some training in kickboxing, and at the end some cardio. On monday and weds I do either basketball, or racquetball which usually gets my heart rate going.



What I really want to try is this www.crossfit.com

Of course I would have to start off slowly but that would be my goals. Sadly, while I have motiviation, to work out, I am much more succesful with a partner, and no one wants to do any weight lifting or serious work outs with me...too busy or they just don't care.

ahurtt
11-13-2007, 07:53 AM
To a point it will increase strength but then after that point you are simply gaining endurance. The only way to gain strength is to progressively keep lifting heavier weight.

destrekor
11-13-2007, 08:12 AM
Originally posted by: skace
First off, anyone can come in here and say they do 50 pushups. Are you doing 50 correct pushups? How is your form? Do you go all the way to the floor? Do you keep your body straight? Do you bend? Do you take your time or do you rush through them as fast as you can? Do you do them at an incline? Have you tried?

I hate when 1 person says they do 50 pushups and then other people try and prescribe advice based on that.

Now, the other obvious thing is that you weigh 120 pounds, pushups are based around benching your weight, which is a good thing. But if you are tiny and don't have any fat or real muscle definition then it is going to be easy for you to get to a point where you can bench what you weigh. This doesn't mean pushups are going to do nothing for a 300 pound overweight man, who can most likely work several years off of pushups and still be gaining benefits. There are things you can do to make a pushup harder for your 120lb ass though. Like others say, use an incline, use weights, use proper form, do compound exercises that utilize pushups as part of the routine, use dumbbells during your pushup, etc. There are a million different pushup exercises because it is a really good base to work from.

I can do right about 50 in 2 minutes for the APFT (army physical fitness test). Upper arms are supposed to be parallel with ground before you come back up, back straight and no dipping. Bad form will not count.
But that's because that tends to be half our PT. ;)

BAMAVOO
11-13-2007, 08:27 AM
Originally posted by: JD50
Originally posted by: bladder23
By being able to do more pushups, does that equate into more strength?

In other words, does doing lots of pushups increase strength at all? or just muscle endurance?

Edit:

120 lbs
5'8
Can do 55 pushups consecutively

Have a gym membership. Need you guys to recommend me how to get triceps, biceps and abs. (Currently pushups, chinups, situps)

Go here, www.stewsmith.com (http://www.stewsmith.com/), buy this, The Complete Guide to Navy SEAL Fitness (http://getfitnow.stores.yahoo.net/comguidtonav.html) and follow the workout routine. You will be in better shape than anyone at the gym.

That will get you lean, cut and in phenomenal shape, if you want a lot of muscle mass stick to weights.


Does this really work? Have you done this and if so do you have pictures to back up your claim? Just wondering as I don't have time to hit the gym. My plans to go during lunch are not working, but if I could do it at home with little to no weights that would be great.

Thanks

Josh123
11-13-2007, 09:02 AM
I'm at about 135lbs. and push-ups and crunches are all I really do. I usually kick my legs up on my bed so I'm at more of an incline. Another thing I do is grip dumbbells laying on the floor and do pushups that way. It's a lot harder for some reason.

Mr Pickles
11-13-2007, 09:18 AM
Originally posted by: ahurtt
To a point it will increase strength but then after that point you are simply gaining endurance. The only way to gain strength is to progressively keep lifting heavier weight.

This is all anyone should have read regarding this topic. What's this about eatings lots of butter? Shens fool. Ahurtt hit it right on the head. When you are starting out, pushups are great because they are easy routine that doesn't take a trip to the gym, you feel the burn, and you are building muscle. But eventually you get used to your body weight. In fact if you are doing things correctly, you should be losing fat and gaining muscle which makes pushups even easier. After a few weeks of pushups you should eventually reach a point in your workout where it just isn't efficient to do all of those pushups to build muscle. Instead, heading to the gym and lifting heavier weight will be more beneficial.

In my opinion, mass is worthless without definition. Eventually pushups transfer from a muscle building workout to more of a cardio workout. When you start lifting heavier weights I feel like its important to do something with cardio in mind, yet something that uses your upper body. Pushups and situps are the answer.

Deeko
11-13-2007, 09:21 AM
pushups are better than nothing....but you aren't going to add much mass with them. At 5'8", 120 pounds, you must be skinny as hell. When I went to college, I was practically a stick figure, and I was 5'6" 125. You have to lift weights, and properly, to add muscle. I started lifting my freshman year, and not really the right way...only put on a couple of pounds. When I started on a good lifting program, I started to actually gain weight, up to 160 now (still only 8% bf).

You have a gym membership, use it. Go to the gym, do bench, incline, flies, pullups, pulldowns, shoulder press, squats, deadlifts, curls, extensions, rows....haha, there's a lot of exercises to do. Also, don't do the same thing all the time, that's how your plateau....one day do 12-15 reps, another do 3-7. Switch which muscle groups you train together every couple of weeks, along with what exercises you do for that muscle. Also, eat a lot of lean, protein-rich food. Chicken is good.

skace
11-13-2007, 09:25 AM
Originally posted by: MrLee
Instead, heading to the gym and lifting heavier weight will be more beneficial.

Just an obvious note, you do not need to head to the gym to improve your workouts. There are plenty of ways to increase the difficulty of a pushup and there are plenty of other exercises that can be done w/ dumbbells from any location (home, gym or otherwise).

One handed dumbbell bench presses can be done off of a bed even (although benches aren't exactly expensive either). Even if you do enjoy going to the gym regularly, I would invest in a limited amount of equipment so that you can workout on days where your schedule may not meet up perfectly, maybe the weather is really bad or you just don't feel like going out.

Situps are the same way. You can keep doing the same situp 9000 times in a row, or you can make it more difficult, you can add weight, you can change the position and type of situp, you can do them off of a yoga ball for added difficulty. If you are still doing the same situp once it has become easy, it is as good as still curling 10 pounds. That does not mean the exercise sucks, it means your approach to the exercise sucks.

JD50
11-13-2007, 02:42 PM
Originally posted by: Injury
Originally posted by: JD50
I'm definitely not an expert here, but I used to be very big into calisthenics. I could do a lot more push ups than my friends that were into weights, but I couldn't bench for shit.

So what you are saying is that doing lots of pushups only gives you a higher threshold for doing more pushups? ;)


MY point is that if you wake up in the morning and do even 100 pushups... even if it's everyday... you aren't going to notice a significant change in your physique unless you look over a longer timeline than if you did a full routine at the gym and ate foods that were beneficial to your goals.

doing 100 push ups every morning won't do much for you. Spend the same amount of time doing push ups, situps, and pull ups as you do in the gym lifting and you will notice a significant change in your physique. I'm talking about a workout routine where you do 500 to 1000 push ups, double the amount of sit ups, and around 200 pull ups (a lot of those will probably be assisted).

bladder23
03-03-2008, 07:01 PM
hey guys, I wanna update you guys on my situation

Currently 5'9, 150lb and have a solid routine in place :)

Seeing great gains and I'm no longer skinny.

success!

0roo0roo
03-03-2008, 07:06 PM
it does. if you can manage to increase the number you can do in a set over time. course don't do it every day, your muscles need to recover and build.
do max set x, and then additional sets with less and less until you can do no more. try to increase the max set every other week or so.
of course you need other workouts to build the rest o fthe muscles.
there are many things you can do without going to the gym for a workout. just a few dumbells gives you plenty of options.

Safeway
03-03-2008, 07:06 PM
Post this in Health & Fitness forum.

irishScott
03-03-2008, 07:10 PM
You can also put your hands closer and keep your elbows in for a tricep workout.
http://www.shapefit.com/tricep...e-tricep-position.html (http://www.shapefit.com/triceps-exercises-pushups-close-tricep-position.html)

cdmccool
03-03-2008, 07:20 PM
It will increase strength to a point then stop completely. After that, it's all muscular endurance.

ja1484
03-03-2008, 07:35 PM
Sigh.

AlienCraft
03-03-2008, 08:02 PM
Where does the conveyor belt figure in? :confused:
I'm pretty sure you don't take off. :shocked: :confused:

lucasorion
03-03-2008, 10:43 PM
One thing I've been doing lately is a pullup, dip, pushup ladder. I do 8 of each back-to-back, then rest 1 minute, then do 7 of each, etc.
By the time I am down to doing the second of 2 pushups, it feels like I am trying to bench 300 lbs.

KoolDrew
03-04-2008, 11:15 AM
Originally posted by: ahurtt
To a point it will increase strength but then after that point you are simply gaining endurance. The only way to gain strength is to progressively keep lifting heavier weight.

Yup.

sonambulo
03-04-2008, 06:08 PM
Originally posted by: BAMAVOO
Originally posted by: JD50
Go here, www.stewsmith.com (http://www.stewsmith.com/), buy this, The Complete Guide to Navy SEAL Fitness (http://getfitnow.stores.yahoo.net/comguidtonav.html) and follow the workout routine. You will be in better shape than anyone at the gym.

That will get you lean, cut and in phenomenal shape, if you want a lot of muscle mass stick to weights.


Does this really work? Have you done this and if so do you have pictures to back up your claim? Just wondering as I don't have time to hit the gym. My plans to go during lunch are not working, but if I could do it at home with little to no weights that would be great.

Thanks



Double down!

I'd love a review of this before I think about purchasing it to see how it's different from the regular Navy SEAL guide to physical fitness.

BlahBlahYouToo
03-04-2008, 06:15 PM
Originally posted by: bladder23
Isnt a push-up just like an upside-down bench press?

edit: but with less weight

no, not exactly.
push ups are one of the best calisthenic exercises for you if done properly. it does shoulders tri's, bi's, chest, abs, legs. you don't get the abs/legs aspect with bench pressing.
when i used to be able to do 70+ push ups, i had a ripped 6 pack. i'm doing about 30 push ups now and just a big one pack.


and i don't get the edit. you get to decide and adjust how much weight to put on the bench press. you can put 10's on the olympic bar and you'll be benching 65 lbs.
but for example, if you weight 150, then you're probably "benching" about 60-70% of that weight.

SociallyChallenged
03-04-2008, 07:38 PM
Originally posted by: sonambulo
Originally posted by: BAMAVOO
Originally posted by: JD50
Go here, www.stewsmith.com (http://www.stewsmith.com/), buy this, The Complete Guide to Navy SEAL Fitness (http://getfitnow.stores.yahoo.net/comguidtonav.html) and follow the workout routine. You will be in better shape than anyone at the gym.

That will get you lean, cut and in phenomenal shape, if you want a lot of muscle mass stick to weights.


Does this really work? Have you done this and if so do you have pictures to back up your claim? Just wondering as I don't have time to hit the gym. My plans to go during lunch are not working, but if I could do it at home with little to no weights that would be great.

Thanks



Double down!

I'd love a review of this before I think about purchasing it to see how it's different from the regular Navy SEAL guide to physical fitness.

It claims that it will help with endurance and stamina. It says nothing about overall strength. That's one things that should be a concern for those thinking about buying that book.

KoolDrew
03-05-2008, 07:54 AM
You guys are all wrong. Doing pushups is the secret to getting jacked.

Just look at this guy...
http://cgi.ebay.com/New-How-to...VWQQrdZ1QQcmdZViewItem (http://cgi.ebay.com/New-How-to-Build-Powerful-Arms-Chest-and-Shoulders-DVD_W0QQitemZ250220845125QQihZ015QQcategoryZ62140Q QssPageNameZWDVWQQrdZ1QQcmdZViewItem)

Koing
03-05-2008, 08:08 AM
Originally posted by: BlahBlahYouToo
Originally posted by: bladder23
Isnt a push-up just like an upside-down bench press?

edit: but with less weight

no, not exactly.
push ups are one of the best calisthenic exercises for you if done properly. it does shoulders tri's, bi's, chest, abs, legs. you don't get the abs/legs aspect with bench pressing.
when i used to be able to do 70+ push ups, i had a ripped 6 pack. i'm doing about 30 push ups now and just a big one pack.


and i don't get the edit. you get to decide and adjust how much weight to put on the bench press. you can put 10's on the olympic bar and you'll be benching 65 lbs.
but for example, if you weight 150, then you're probably "benching" about 60-70% of that weight.

Being able to loads of push ups has no bearing on your '6 pack'. Your 6 pack if a function of having developed abs that lump out (most people lack this for one) and having a low enough bf% to show your abs. Your abs are always there but are covered with a layer of fat due to your bf% being too high to show your abs.

Koing

BlahBlahYouToo
03-05-2008, 11:27 AM
Originally posted by: Koing
Originally posted by: BlahBlahYouToo
Originally posted by: bladder23
Isnt a push-up just like an upside-down bench press?

edit: but with less weight

no, not exactly.
push ups are one of the best calisthenic exercises for you if done properly. it does shoulders tri's, bi's, chest, abs, legs. you don't get the abs/legs aspect with bench pressing.
when i used to be able to do 70+ push ups, i had a ripped 6 pack. i'm doing about 30 push ups now and just a big one pack.


and i don't get the edit. you get to decide and adjust how much weight to put on the bench press. you can put 10's on the olympic bar and you'll be benching 65 lbs.
but for example, if you weight 150, then you're probably "benching" about 60-70% of that weight.

Being able to loads of push ups has no bearing on your '6 pack'. Your 6 pack if a function of having developed abs that lump out (most people lack this for one) and having a low enough bf% to show your abs. Your abs are always there but are covered with a layer of fat due to your bf% being too high to show your abs.

Koing

oh but it does.
i'm not saying that doing lots of push ups will automatically make your abs ripped, but a bench press will not work your abs the way a push up will. doing lots of push ups will be like hold a plank position for a long time which DOES work out your abs.
do you disagree with that?

KoolDrew
03-05-2008, 12:33 PM
Originally posted by: BlahBlahYouToo
Originally posted by: Koing
Originally posted by: BlahBlahYouToo
Originally posted by: bladder23
Isnt a push-up just like an upside-down bench press?

edit: but with less weight

no, not exactly.
push ups are one of the best calisthenic exercises for you if done properly. it does shoulders tri's, bi's, chest, abs, legs. you don't get the abs/legs aspect with bench pressing.
when i used to be able to do 70+ push ups, i had a ripped 6 pack. i'm doing about 30 push ups now and just a big one pack.


and i don't get the edit. you get to decide and adjust how much weight to put on the bench press. you can put 10's on the olympic bar and you'll be benching 65 lbs.
but for example, if you weight 150, then you're probably "benching" about 60-70% of that weight.

Being able to loads of push ups has no bearing on your '6 pack'. Your 6 pack if a function of having developed abs that lump out (most people lack this for one) and having a low enough bf% to show your abs. Your abs are always there but are covered with a layer of fat due to your bf% being too high to show your abs.

Koing

oh but it does.
i'm not saying that doing lots of push ups will automatically make your abs ripped, but a bench press will not work your abs the way a push up will. doing lots of push ups will be like hold a plank position for a long time which DOES work out your abs.
do you disagree with that?

Yes, but with no progressive overload outside of increasing reps, you'll eventually reach a point where it's basically an endurance activity, and nothing more. You wouldn't bench just the 45-pound bar 50+ times and hope to get muscle gains, so why would you think doing a ton of pushups would?

Koing
03-05-2008, 12:51 PM
Originally posted by: BlahBlahYouToo
Originally posted by: Koing
Originally posted by: BlahBlahYouToo
Originally posted by: bladder23
Isnt a push-up just like an upside-down bench press?

edit: but with less weight

no, not exactly.
push ups are one of the best calisthenic exercises for you if done properly. it does shoulders tri's, bi's, chest, abs, legs. you don't get the abs/legs aspect with bench pressing.
when i used to be able to do 70+ push ups, i had a ripped 6 pack. i'm doing about 30 push ups now and just a big one pack.


and i don't get the edit. you get to decide and adjust how much weight to put on the bench press. you can put 10's on the olympic bar and you'll be benching 65 lbs.
but for example, if you weight 150, then you're probably "benching" about 60-70% of that weight.

Being able to loads of push ups has no bearing on your '6 pack'. Your 6 pack if a function of having developed abs that lump out (most people lack this for one) and having a low enough bf% to show your abs. Your abs are always there but are covered with a layer of fat due to your bf% being too high to show your abs.

Koing

oh but it does.
i'm not saying that doing lots of push ups will automatically make your abs ripped, but a bench press will not work your abs the way a push up will. doing lots of push ups will be like hold a plank position for a long time which DOES work out your abs.
do you disagree with that?

If your want abs do an L sit or do an L sit pullup. I can gurantee few guys here can do 5 pull ups whilst keeping their legs parallel to the floor.

Bulkoffs: http://homepage.ntlworld.com/p...a/Koing%20BulkOffs.wmv (http://homepage.ntlworld.com/ph.chea/Koing%20BulkOffs.wmv) pole vaulters love it

Dragon flies : http://homepage.ntlworld.com/p...-%20Dragon%20Flags.wmv (http://homepage.ntlworld.com/ph.chea/K_gymnastics/AB2%20-%20Dragon%20Flags.wmv) : tough exercise

If you bench press properly your body (abs and back) are very tensed up and your pushing hard with your feet on the ground. Your hips on the bench with the natural curve of your spine towards your lower lumber.

Koing

spamsk8r
03-05-2008, 01:58 PM
Originally posted by: KoolDrew
You guys are all wrong. Doing pushups is the secret to getting jacked.

Just look at this guy...
http://cgi.ebay.com/New-How-to...VWQQrdZ1QQcmdZViewItem (http://cgi.ebay.com/New-How-to-Build-Powerful-Arms-Chest-and-Shoulders-DVD_W0QQitemZ250220845125QQihZ015QQcategoryZ62140Q QssPageNameZWDVWQQrdZ1QQcmdZViewItem)

Hahaha, I'm more jacked than that guy, and I'm a fat slob.

(although pushups are a good part of a balanced routine, IMO)